. Earth Science News .

Swimming Jellyfish May Influence Global Climate
by Staff Writers
Los Angeles CA (SPX) Nov 08, 2011

File image.

Swimming jellyfish and other marine animals help mix warm and cold water in the oceans and, by increasing the rate at which heat can travel through the ocean, may influence global climate.

The controversial idea was first proposed by researchers out of the California Technical Institute in 2009, but new information may help the scientists support their claim.

Dr. Kakani Katija Young, who worked on the original paper, and her team at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute published an article in the Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE) this month, explaining how to use a Self-Contained Underwater Velocimetry Apparatus (SCUVA).

The apparatus is used underwater at night to light up animals, like jellyfish, swimming in the ocean. It also illuminates the particles around the animals, showing how the animals move the water around them when they swim.

The combined effect of all ocean life swimming in concert may have an impact on ocean climate on the same magnitude as wind.

Though the apparatus was used in the original research, Dr. Young is publishing the experimental technique now in the hopes that other scientists will use it to gather more evidence supporting her theory.

"We felt that it is such a powerful tool that isn't being used in the community," she said.

"And I feel that people learn so much better from visual material than they do from just reading text."

JoVE is the first peer reviewed video journal indexed in PubMed and MEDLINE, so Dr. Young's technique is demonstrated in video format, rather than simply in text.

Related Links
Journal of Visualized Experiments
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics

Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
Buy Advertising Editorial Enquiries


. Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

NOAA designates critical habitat for black abalone
Washington DC (SPX) Nov 08, 2011
NOAA's Fisheries Service has filed with the Federal Register a final rule that identifies black abalone critical habitat along the California coast. In February 2009, black abalone was listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act, and the Act requires critical habitat be designated, to the maximum extent prudent and determinable, whenever a species is listed for protection. Once a ... read more

Tokyo city starts radiation tests on food in shops

Social media use soars in flood-hit Thailand

Current Training Programs May Not Prepare Firefighters to Combat Stress

Japan govt hands $11.5 bln aid to TEPCO: reports

Tying atomic threads in knots may produce material benefits

An Incredible Shrinking Material

GMV Awarded Contract For Paz Satellite Control Center

Trillions served: Massive, complex projects for DOE JGI 2012 Community Sequencing Program

Geologists find ponds not the cause of arsenic poisoning in India's groundwater

Sea life "must swim faster to survive"

NOAA designates critical habitat for black abalone

Crop diversity myths persist in media

NASA Airborne Mission Maps Remote, Deteriorating Glaciers

Peatland carbon storage is stabilized against catastrophic release of carbon

New webcam allows world to watch live polar bear migration

Campaigners push for vast Antarctic marine reserve

Nitrogen Fertilizers' Impact on Lawn Soils

Research team unravels tomato pathogen's tricks of the trade

Peru's Congress approves 10-year GMO ban

African farmers struggle to fund green projects

Thai PM to skip APEC summit due to flood crisis

Orange smoke billows out of Congolese volcano

Floods show what lies ahead for sinking Bangkok

More than 500 die in Thai floods

Hitting the bottle to solve Nigeria's housing problem

China denies abuses in Zambian mines

Kenya claims Somali rebels receive third weapons airdrop

Chinese firms accused of ignoring Zambian workers' rights

The benefits of being the first to settle

Human skin begins tanning in seconds, and here's how

Jawbone found in England is from the earliest known modern human in northwestern Europe

Increased use of bikes for commuting offers economic, health benefits


The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2011 - Space Media Network. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement