Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Earth Science News .




DISASTER MANAGEMENT
The best defense against catastrophic storms: Mother Nature, say Stanford researchers
by Elizabeth Rauer for Stanford News
Stanford CA (SPX) Jul 19, 2013


Natural coastline like this in Rehoboth Bay, Del., can protect homes and cities against storms.

Extreme weather, sea level rise and degraded coastal systems are placing people and property at greater risk along the coast. Natural habitats such as dunes and reefs are critical to protecting millions of U.S. residents and billions of dollars in property from coastal storms, according to a new study by scientists with the Natural Capital Project at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment.

The study, "Coastal habitats shield people and property from sea-level rise and storms," published July 14 in the journal Nature Climate Change, offers the first comprehensive map of the entire U.S. coastline that shows where and how much protection communities get from natural habitats such as sand dunes, coral reefs, sea grasses and mangroves. The likelihood and magnitude of losses can be reduced by intact ecosystems near vulnerable coastal communities.

One map shows predicted exposure of the United States coastline and coastal population to sea level rise and storms in the year 2100. An interactive map can be zoomed in on for the West, Gulf or East coasts; Hawaii or Alaska; or the continental United States.

"The natural environment plays a key role in protecting our nation's coasts," said study lead author Katie Arkema, a Woods postdoctoral scholar. "If we lose these defenses, we will either have to have massive investments in engineered defenses or risk greater damage to millions of people and billions in property."

With the release of the Obama administration's Climate Action Plan on June 25, there is renewed interest in coastal resilience and climate adaptation planning, as well as in finding natural ways to protect America's coastline. Billions of dollars will soon be spent on restoration activities in the Gulf of Mexico and the Eastern Seaboard affected by Hurricane Sandy. Leaders can make decisions now to factor natural capital into decisions that could have long-term benefits.

"As a nation, we should be investing in nature to protect our coastal communities," said Mary Ruckelshaus, managing director of the Natural Capital Project. "The number of people, poor families, elderly and total value of residential property that are most exposed to hazards can be reduced by half if existing coastal habitats remain fully intact."

At a moment when many coastal planners are considering their options for dealing with the impacts of sea level rise, the study provides both a national and a localized look at coastal areas where restoration and conservation of natural habitats could make the biggest difference.

"Hardening our shorelines with sea walls and other costly engineering shouldn't be the default solution," said Peter Kareiva, the chief scientist at The Nature Conservancy and co-author of the study. "This study helps us identify those places and opportunities we have to keep nature protecting our coastal communities - and giving us all the other benefits it can provide, such as recreation, fish nurseries, water filtration and erosion control."

The Natural Capital Project is a partnership with the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, the University of Minnesota's Institute on the Environment, The Nature Conservancy and the World Wildlife Fund, aimed at aligning economic forces with conservation. The project works to integrate ecosystem services approaches into all major resource decisions that affect Earth's natural resources.

.


Related Links
Stanford
Natural Capital Project
Bringing Order To A World Of Disasters
A world of storm and tempest
When the Earth Quakes






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Long-forgotten seawall protected New Jersey homes from Sandy
Bay Head NJ (SPX) Jul 18, 2013
Picture two residential beach communities on the New Jersey shore: Bay Head and Mantoloking, which sit side-by-side in Ocean County on a narrow barrier island that separates the Atlantic Ocean and Barnegat Bay. Before Hurricane Sandy landed on Oct. 29, 2012, a motorist traveling north on Ocean Avenue would seamlessly travel through Mantoloking into Bay Head, noticing few changes in residen ... read more


DISASTER MANAGEMENT
The best defense against catastrophic storms: Mother Nature, say Stanford researchers

NASA, International Space Agencies Note Benefits of Space Station during Disasters on Earth

Rain no dampener for New Zealand cardboard cathedral

Long-forgotten seawall protected New Jersey homes from Sandy

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Unusual material expands dramatically under pressure

Milikelvins drive droplet evaporation

Stanford scientists break record for thinnest light-absorber

Penn researchers help show new way to study and improve catalytic reactions

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Water at risk from power plants, climate change

European fish stocks poised for recovery

First atlas on oceanic plankton

Raw sewage makes summer swimming hazardous in New York

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Russia blocks bid for Antarctic sanctuary: NGOs

Continuous satellite monitoring of ice sheets needed to better predict sea-level rise

Researchers Shed New Light on Supraglacial Lake Drainage

Scientists cast doubt on theory of what triggered Antarctic glaciation

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Driverless tractors till German high-tech farm

How rice twice became a crop and twice became a weed - and what it means for the future

Revealed the keys to reducing the impact of agriculture on climate change

Tapid detection and identification of downy mildew in basil

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Moderate earthquake rattles New Zealand capital

'Brown Ocean' Can Fuel Inland Tropical Cyclones

Some volcanoes 'scream' at ever-higher pitches until they blow their tops

Scientists say earthquake could wake Mount Fuji from 300-year slumber

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Nigeria to withdraw some troops from Mali

Climate change to hit Volta Basin for energy, farming

A South Sudan moka? What else?

Madagascar villagers accuse army of mass killings

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Archaeologist says he's uncovered King David's palace

Brain signal said to create inner 'voice' we hear even if we're silent

Genetic evolution seen in peoples living at high altitudes

China island centenarians claim secret of long life




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement