Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Earth Science News .




WATER WORLD
The saying 'It never rains but it pours' is truer than ever in Scotland
by Staff Writers
Warwick, UK (SPX) Sep 17, 2015


New research at the University of Warwick with colleagues from the London School of Economics has identified changes in the shape of rainfall across Europe; changes in the amount of drizzle compared with downpours and everything in-between. Image courtesy Univertsity of Warwick. Watch a video on the research here.

New research at the University of Warwick with colleagues from the London School of Economics has identified changes in the shape of rainfall across Europe; changes in the amount of drizzle compared with downpours and everything in-between.

Professor Sandra Chapman of the University of Warwick and co-authors Professor Nicholas Watkins and Dr David Stainforth from the London School of Economics have published new research demonstrating how the variability in the way it rains makes it intrinsically difficult to identify the character of local climate change.

Difficult but not impossible. In places such as Scotland, the Dordogne, Tuscany and the Low Countries, changes are evident despite the variability. The research team have looked at 63 years' worth of European rainfall data and found location-specific changes in the character of rainfall that are sometimes big enough to pick out directly from the local observations.

Sandra Chapman from the University of Warwick said: "We have found that in many places in Scotland the rain on heavy rainfall days has increased by over 50%. However, in some places in the Highlands this rain has shifted from light rain days so overall it's not much wetter but when it does rain it is more intense. In other Scottish locations the change reflects an increase in the total amount of rain and snow overall. For all these areas of Scotland the old adage "It never rains but it pours" has become truer than ever.

"We have also found related results across Europe. In south west France it is drier with less rain on all types of rainy days but in Tuscany it is drier with heavy rainfall in particular being reduced."

Nicholas Watkins from the London School of Economics and the University of Warwick said: "Knowing the change in average rainfall is not enough to understand the change in intense rainfall. In fact changes in variability often have a greater impact on extremes.

"The research demonstrates how rainfall variability - in particular what is known as the "long tail" of rainfall distributions - makes it hard to identify changes just by looking at local observations. Even when we create data where changes are known to exist they can sometimes be impossible to identify because there aren't many days in a season.

So just looking out your window - even if you do it every day and keep a careful log - can create a misleading impression about local climate change. Our method quantities this uncertainty directly from the observations; we can identify when we know things are changing, when we know things are not changing, and when we know that the data cannot tell us whether things are changing or not."

David Stainforth from the London School of Economics said: "This work demonstrates how the impacts of climate change are complicated and local. As a consequence it is likely that individuals will have different perspectives on anthropogenic climate change if their views are based mainly on personal experiences of weather rather than on the underlying fundamental science."

"This study, and an earlier related one on temperature differences by the same team, provides a new source of information to support local decisions made in the context of climate change; decisions relating to flood protection, insurance, water provision, agricultural planning or even just what will grow best in your garden."

The research is presented in the paper Limits to the quantification of local climate change, by S. C. Chapman, D. A. Stainforth, and N. W. Watkins published in the journal Environmental Research Letters on 16th September 2015. Chapman et al 2015 Limits to the quantification of local climate change Environ. Res. Lett. 10 094018. DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/10/9/094018


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
University of Warwick
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WATER WORLD
Last chance for oasis in China's desert
Munich, Germany (SPX) Sep 14, 2015
Ten percent of the world's cotton is produced in the Xinjiang region in northwestern China. Irrigating the cotton fields, however, is causing ecological problems. After many years of research, a team of international researchers headed by Prof. Markus Disse at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed a set of recommendations aimed at preserving the local environment. The Tari ... read more


WATER WORLD
Coast Guard's Rescue 21 Alaska communications system upgrade

Babies and children among 34 dead in Aegean migrant boat sinking

US hospital ship brings care, hope to poor Haitians

Typhoon-hit Philippine island rebuilding fast: UN official

WATER WORLD
Material scientists develop transparent glass 3-D printing technology

Billie Holiday to return to New York stage -- by hologram

Digital Fusion Solutions to help U.S. Army with laser project

Self-sweeping laser could dramatically shrink 3-D mapping systems

WATER WORLD
US navy agrees to limit sonar, explosives near marine mammals

Last chance for oasis in China's desert

Southern Ocean removing carbon dioxide from atmosphere more efficiently

Study links large dams with malaria infections

WATER WORLD
The Antarctic Ocean has increased its absorption of CO2

Burning remaining fossil fuel could cause 60-meter sea level rise

Climate research: Where is the world's permafrost thawing

Archaeologists piece together how crew survived 1813 shipwreck in Alaska

WATER WORLD
French winemakers hunt for climate change-resistant grape

Pay farmers to help the environment, but perverse subsidies not

What's behind million-dollar oil palm failures

Crop rotation boosts soil microbes, benefits plant growth

WATER WORLD
Japan warns tourists on Mount Aso after eruption

All missing people found after Japan floods: authorities

Flash flood toll rises to eight in US state of Utah

El Nino may accelerate nuisance flooding

WATER WORLD
Mozambique opposition boycotts peace talks

Horse ban in NE Nigeria after Boko Haram attacks

Sudan police break up Omdurman protest with tear gas: witnesses

US dentist who killed Cecil the lion breaks silence

WATER WORLD
Bonobos use finger-pointing, hand gestures to communicate

Fossil trove adds a new limb to human family tree

Ancient human shoulders reveal links to ape ancestors

A one-million-year-old monkey fossil




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.