Earth Science News  





. Waterborne Disease Risk Upped In Great Lakes

A primary threat to human health are the extreme precipitation events that overwhelm the combined urban storm water and sewage systems such as those in Milwaukee and Chicago, resulting in millions of gallons of raw sewage being diverted to Lake Michigan.
by Staff Writers
Madison WI (SPX) Oct 15, 2008
An anticipated increased incidence of climate-related extreme rainfall events in the Great Lakes region may raise the public health risk for the 40 million people who depend on the lakes for their drinking water, according to a new study.

In a report published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, a team of Wisconsin researchers reports that a trend toward extreme weather such as the monsoon-like rainfall events that occurred in many parts of the region this past spring is likely to aggravate the risk for outbreaks of waterborne disease in the Great Lakes region.

"If weather extremes do intensify, as these findings suggest, our health will be at greater risk," according to Jonathan Patz, a University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health professor of population health and an expert on the health effects of climate change.

A primary threat to human health, says Patz, are the extreme precipitation events that overwhelm the combined urban storm water and sewage systems such as those in Milwaukee and Chicago, resulting in millions of gallons of raw sewage being diverted to Lake Michigan.

Adding to the risk throughout the region, Patz notes, is the growing concentration of livestock operations where heavy rainfall can wash large amounts of animal waste into the rivers and streams that drain into the Great Lakes, the world's greatest concentration of fresh surface water.

"It's the perfect storm," notes Patz. "Deteriorating urban water infrastructure, intensified livestock operations, and extreme climate change-related weather events may well put water quality, and thereby our health, at risk."

Waterborne diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria, viruses and parasites are among the most common health risks of drinking water. In 1993, Milwaukee experienced an outbreak in city drinking water of the parasite Cryptosporidium that exposed more than 400,000 people and killed more than 50.

Patz, who is also affiliated with UW-Madison's Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies' Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment, conducted the study with Stephen Vavrus, a climatologist and director of the UW-Madison Center for Climatic Research, also part of the Nelson Institute.

Changes in regional weather patterns and, in particular, an increase in the number and intensity of severe rainfall events are predicted to accompany global warming. Climatologists have already cataloged a decades-long trend toward more tempestuous weather, says Vavrus.

"We have seen an uptick in the incidence of severe precipitation events in the last couple of years, but this has been a trend for decades," says Vavrus, noting an increased frequency of both major storms and total precipitation in the late 20th century.

"And we are expecting climate (in the Great Lakes region) to change significantly in the future, so we'll very likely see an increase in these extreme precipitation events."

Climate change, scientists know, will prompt extremes of the hydrologic cycle, causing intensified precipitation as well as drought.

Using the best available computer climate models, the Wisconsin researchers found that southern Wisconsin is likely to experience a 10 to 40 percent increase in the strength of extremely heavy precipitation events, leading to greater potential for flooding and the waterborne diseases that accompany the high discharge of sewage into Lake Michigan.

Previously, Patz led a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-funded study linking outbreaks of waterborne disease in the U.S. to extreme rainfall. That study, published in 2001, showed that two-thirds of waterborne disease outbreaks between 1948 and 1994 were correlated with heavy rainfall.

The new study, say Patz and Vavrus, points to a need to strengthen pubic health infrastructure and improve aging urban drinking water and sewage systems, and to improve land use planning to reduce the amount of runoff that occurs in urban areas during major precipitation events.

"This is where climate policy, land use policy and public health come together," Patz argues.

Community
Email This Article
Comment On This Article

Share This Article With Planet Earth
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit
YahooMyWebYahooMyWeb GoogleGoogle FacebookFacebook



Related Links
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Epidemics on Earth - Bird Flu, HIV/AIDS, Ebola




Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
Analysis: Flu pandemic would overwhelm
Washington (UPI) Oct 2, 2008
In the case of an influenza pandemic, the U.S. healthcare system would be inadequately prepared to meet the needs of an infected population, according to a report released this week by federal auditors.

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



  • Mexico prepares shelters ahead of Hurricane Norbert
  • Six dead in China landslide: state media
  • Disasters kill more in 2008 than in tsunami: UN
  • Portable Imaging System Will Help Disaster Response

  • On climate change, US contenders share the wavelength
  • Financial crisis won't delay Australian carbon trade: PM
  • Financial crisis must not slow talks on CO2 emissions: UN
  • EU chief urges leaders not to ditch climate goals

  • GeoEye Releases First Image Collected By GeoEye-1
  • Maps Shed Light On CO2's Global Nature
  • 2008 Ozone Hole Larger Than Last Year
  • Smog Blog For Central America And Caribbean Debuts

  • Analysis: Iraq welcomes oil firm bids
  • Analysis: Ecuador threatens foreign oil
  • US Company Launches First-Ever All-Electric Motors For Boats
  • NECO Wind - Colorado's Largest Community-Based Wind Development

  • Waterborne Disease Risk Upped In Great Lakes
  • Analysis: Flu pandemic would overwhelm
  • Two people die of rare form of plague in Tibet: report
  • AIDS virus leapt the species barrier early last century: study

  • Chimpanzees Endangered In Their Last Stronghold
  • Beavers: Dam Good For Songbirds
  • Bold Traveler's Journey Toward The Center Of The Earth
  • Global warming sending tropical species uphill: study

  • Defence lawyers threaten to stop Ivory Coast pollution trial
  • Defendant in Ivorian toxic waste trial blames Trafigura affiliate
  • Pollution trial opens in Ivory Coast
  • Beijing announces steps to fight smog, traffic

  • Eight of China's 10 oldest people are ethnic minorities: report
  • First-Ever Global Sustainable Tourism Criteria
  • Egalitarian Revolution In The Pleistocene
  • New Formula Predicts How People Will Migrate In Coming Decades

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2007 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement