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World Bank, France pledge 910 million dollars in quake funds: report

The May 12 Sichuan earthquake, which left over 87,000 dead or missing, was the most devastating quake to hit China in over three decades.
by Staff Writers
Beijing (AFP) Oct 26, 2008
The World Bank and the French Development Agency have agreed to lend China 910 million dollars in reconstruction funds for the devastating Sichuan earthquake, state press said Sunday.

The agreement was reached at an earthquake investment conference in southwest China's Sichuan province, Xinhua news agency said.

The World Bank would provide an emergency recovery loan of 710 million dollars, while the French agency would provide a loan for 200 million dollars, the report said.

The May 12 Sichuan earthquake, which left over 87,000 dead or missing, was the most devastating quake to hit China in over three decades.

The government estimates that a three-year reconstruction plan will cost 147 billion dollars.

The World Bank funds, 200 million of which will go for reconstruction efforts in neighbouring Gansu province, are expected to get final approval in December, the report said.

The money will be earmarked for the construction of roads, bridges, water supply pipelines, hospitals and child health care facilities, it said. The French funds will be used for urban infrastructure construction and the building of rural homes.

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Beijing Promises Better School Construction After Quake
Beijing (AFP) Oct 24, 2008
China plans to improve the ability of schools to withstand earthquakes by revising a law in the wake of May's devastating quake that killed thousands of pupils, state media said Friday.







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