Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




FLORA AND FAUNA
100 most threatened species
by Staff Writers
London UK (SPX) Sep 14, 2012


The saola (Pseudoryx nghetinhensis) is one of the most threatened mammals in Southeast Asia.

For the first time ever, more than 8,000 scientists from the IUCN Species Survival Commission (IUCN SSC) have come together to identify 100 of the most threatened animals, plants and fungi on the planet. But conservationists fear they'll be allowed to die out because none of these species provide humans with obvious benefits.

Professor Jonathan Baillie, ZSL's Director of Conservation explains: "The donor community and conservation movement are leaning increasingly towards a 'what can nature do for us' approach, where species and wild habitats are valued and prioritised according to the services they provide for people. This has made it increasingly difficult for conservationists to protect the most threatened species on the planet.

While the utilitarian value of nature is important conservation goes beyond this. Do these species have a right to survive or do we have a right to drive them to extinction?"

The report, called Priceless or Worthless?, will be presented at the IUCN World Conservation Congress in South Korea this week, and hopes to push the conservation of 'worthless' creatures up the agenda that is set by NGOs from around the globe.

Co-author of the report, ZSL's Ellen Butcher says: "All the species listed are unique and irreplaceable. If they vanish, no amount of money can bring them back. However, if we take immediate action we can give them a fighting chance for survival. But this requires society to support the moral and ethical position that all species have an inherent right to exist."

Their declines have mainly been caused by humans, but in almost all cases scientists believe their extinction can still be avoided if conservation efforts are specifically focused. Conservation actions deliver results with many species such as Przewalski's Horse (Equus ferus) and Humpback Whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) have being saved from extinction.

The 100 species, from 48 different countries are first in line to disappear completely if nothing is done to protect them.

The pygmy three-toed sloth (Bradypus pygmaeus) is one of the animals facing a bleak future. Escudo Island, 17km off the coast of Panama, is the only place in the world where these tiny sloths are found. At half the size of their mainland cousins, and weighing roughly the same as a newborn baby, pygmy sloths are the smallest and slowest sloths in the world and remain Critically Endangered.

Similarly, the saola (Pseudoryx nghetinhensis) is one of the most threatened mammals in Southeast Asia. Known as the Asian unicorn because of its rarity, the population of these antelope may be down to few tens of individuals today.

In the UK, a small area in Wales is the only place in the world where the brightly coloured willow blister (Cryptomyces maximus) is found. Populations of the spore-shooting fungi are currently in decline, and a single catastrophic event could cause their total destruction.

Professor Baillie adds: "If we believe these species are priceless it is time for the conservation community, government and industry to step up to the plate and show future generations that we value all life.''

Whilst monetising nature remains a worthwhile necessity for conservationists, the wider value of species on the brink of extinction should not be disregarded, the report states.

"All species have a value to nature and thus in turn to humans," says Dr Simon Stuart, Chair IUCN Species Survival Commission. "Although the value of some species may not appear obvious at first, all species in fact contribute in their way to the healthy functioning of the planet."

ZSL and IUCN will be presenting 'Priceless or Worthless?' at the IUCN World Conservation Congress in Jeju, South Korea on 11th September 2012.

.


Related Links
Zoological Society of London
Darwin Today At TerraDaily.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





FLORA AND FAUNA
New Research Suggests Bacteria Are Social Microorganisms
Washington DC (SPX) Sep 12, 2012
New research from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology reveals that some unlikely subjects--bacteria--can have social structures similar to plants and animals. The research shows that a few individuals in groups of closely related bacteria have the ability to produce chemical compounds that kill or slow the growth of other populations of bacteria in the environment, but not harm their own. ... read more


FLORA AND FAUNA
Norway supplies $168M for famine relief

Haunting 'Land of Hope' part shot on location in Fukushima

Japan slams brakes on $63 billion in spending

25 killed in ammunition depot blast in western Turkey: army

FLORA AND FAUNA
Nano-velcro clasps heavy metal molecules in its grips

HYLAS 2 Communications Satellite Completes In-Orbit Testing

U.S. Air Force Chooses Northrop Grumman to Demonstrate Next-Generation Air Defense Radar System

iPhone 5 not just a phone; it's a stimulus too

FLORA AND FAUNA
A minute crustacean invades the red swamp crayfish

NASA Voyage Set to Explore Link Between Sea Saltiness and Climate

Australian lawmakers block super-trawler

Former world leaders call on UN Security Council to recognize water as a top concern

FLORA AND FAUNA
Little Ice Age led to migration of island hopping arctic foxes

Sailboat navigates once-frozen Arctic waterway

Glacial thinning has sharply accelerated at major South American icefields

Russia charges Greenpeace activists in polar bear protest

FLORA AND FAUNA
Researchers Use "Banker Plants" to Help Battle Whitefly Pests

Screening technique uncovers five new plant activator compounds

Drought sends US producer prices surging

Turf study to monitor runoff, establish fertilizer management practices

FLORA AND FAUNA
Eruptions weaken at Guatemala's Volcano of Fire

Santorini sees growth spurt

Researchers Devise More Accurate Method for Predicting Hurricane Activity

Powerful typhoon on course to hit Japan's Okinawa

FLORA AND FAUNA
Zimbabwe's Mugabe inaugurates Chinese-built defence college

Malema mocks S.African 'high alert' for military bases

Zimbabwe wildlife ranchers warn on Mugabe party takeovers

Mali coup leader 'in sync' with govt on reclaiming north

FLORA AND FAUNA
Mapping a genetic world beyond genes

UC Santa Cruz provides access to encyclopedia of the human genome

Researchers identify biochemical functions for most of the human genome

Major advances in understanding the regulation and organization of the human genome




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement