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DISASTER MANAGEMENT
477 dead, homeless swell after Philippines typhoon
by Staff Writers
New Bataan, Philippines (AFP) Dec 6, 2012


UN offers to mobilize help for Philippine storm victims
United Nations (AFP) Dec 6, 2012 - The United Nations on Thursday offered to mobilize international support for the Philippines after a major typhoon left at least 477 dead.

"The United Nations stands ready to provide humanitarian assistance and to mobilize international support for the response," Ban's spokesman Martin Nesirky said.

Nesirky said UN leader Ban Ki-moon had sent "sincere condolences" to the Philippine government over Typhoon Bopha, which hit Mindanao island on Tuesday leaving the hundreds of dead and at least 250,000 homeless.

Philippine rebels offer truce in storm-hit areas
Manila (AFP) Dec 6, 2012 - Philippine communist guerrillas offered to suspend attacks in typhoon-hit areas Thursday, as the military led efforts to look for hundreds of missing from a disaster that claimed nearly 500 lives.

"In light of the urgent humanitarian considerations, the (New People's Army) can suspend offensive military operations... for a period of time," the rebel group's parent organisation the Communist Party of the Philippines said.

A rebel statement said its forces would "raise funds, seek donations and contributions" for Typhoon Bopha's victims on the southern island of Mindanao, while its armed guerrillas would help in the relief work.

In reaction, military spokesman Colonel Arnulfo Burgos, said "if they really want peace and stability for our country for unhampered progress and development, they should abandon armed violence".

The armed forces are at the forefront of rescue and relief efforts after Tuesday's disaster, which killed 477 people and forced 250,000 others to seek shelter at government evacuation centres after losing everything.

The military estimates the NPA's current strength at about 4,000 fighters nationwide, significantly down from more than 26,000 at its peak in the 1980s.

The communists have been waging a rebellion since 1969, and more than 30,000 people have died in the conflict, according to the government.

The government opened peace talks with the CPP but negotiations were suspended in November last year due to continued rebel demands for the release of jailed comrades they claimed were consultants to the negotiations.

A quarter million people were homeless and 477 confirmed dead after the Philippines' worst typhoon this year, officials said Thursday, as the government appealed for international help.

Typhoon Bopha ploughed across Mindanao island on Tuesday, flattening whole towns in its path as hurricane-force winds brought torrential rain that triggered floods and landslides.

Erinea Cantilla and her family walked barefoot for two days in a vain search for food and shelter through a muddy wasteland near the mountainous town of New Bataan after the deluge destroyed their house and banana and cocoa farm.

"Everything we had is gone. The only ones left are dead people," Cantilla told AFP as she and her husband, three children and a granddaughter reached the outskirts of the town, which itself had been nearly totally obliterated.

Rescuers said they were looking for 380 missing while seeking help for more than 250,000 others who were sheltered in schools, gyms and other buildings after losing everything.

Shell-shocked survivors scrabbled through the rubble of their homes to find anything that could be recovered, as relatives searched for missing family members among mud-caked bodies laid out in rows on tarpaulins.

President Benigno Aquino has sent food and other supplies by ship to 150,000 people on Mindanao's east coast where three towns remain cut off by landslides and wrecked bridges, Interior Secretary Mar Roxas said.

Officials said many of the 477 dead victims were poor migrants who found work at landslide-prone sites such as New Bataan and nearby Monkayo towns, either at unregulated gold mines or at banana plantations.

Bopha, flower in Cambodian, wiped out a fourth of the country's banana crop, according to the local industry association.

Major-General Ariel Bernardo, head of the army division leading the rescue effort, said 36 people had been dug out alive in two days, but the prospects were looking dimmer for the hundreds still missing.

"I do not think it likely," he told AFP when asked if he thought most of the missing were still alive.

Civil defence chief Benito Ramos refused to give up hope.

"There is no time limit -- as long as it takes," he told reporters when asked how long the search and rescue effort would take.

A man trapped for two days under rocks and debris after flash floods swept away his entire family was among those rescued Thursday.

"It's a miracle that I survived, but I might as well be dead," said Carlos Agang, 54, who suffered a broken right leg.

Social Welfare Secretary Corazon Soliman said the government asked the Switzerland-based International Organization for Migration to help it build bunkhouses to ease the pressure on evacuation camps.

The United States, Japan and Singapore said they had offered emergency assistance, with the latter sending over a rescue team in Mindanao.

Geneva-based International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies appealed for 4.5 million Swiss francs (3.7 million euros, $4.9 million) for relief aid, warning the number of people needing help would rise in coming days.

Meanwhile the insurgent Communist Party of the Philippines offered a truce with government forces now leading the rescue in Mindanao, while ordering its guerrillas there to help out.

The army dismissed the offer, with a military spokesman saying the rebels should abandon their armed campaign instead.

Workers were struggling to reach villages due to destroyed roads and wrecked bridges, but finding corpses was not a problem due to the overpowering stench everywhere, said Francisco Macalipay, a soldier involved in the rescue.

"Just let your nose lead you to them," he told AFP.

Philippine 'miracle survivor' mourns lost family
New Bataan, Philippines (AFP) Dec 6, 2012 - A Philippines typhoon "miracle survivor" was rescued Thursday after being trapped for two days under rocks and debris in flash floods that swept away his entire family and their farming hamlet.

Slathered in mud and teary-eyed, Carlos Agang recounted how a small community of banana and coconut farmers was obliterated as Typhoon Bopha unleashed a wall of water after making landfall on southern Mindanao island on Tuesday.

"It's a miracle that I survived, but I might as well be dead," the 54-year-old told reporters as aid workers carried him off on a stretcher with a broken leg to be airlifted to hospital.

Typhoon Bopha ploughed across Mindanao, flattening whole towns in its 700-kilometre (435-mile) wide path with a deadly blend of hurricane-force winds, floods and landslides, leaving nearly 200,000 homeless and more than 300 dead.

The typhoon triggered flash floods which carried away Agang's mountainside home outside New Bataan along with him, his wife and four children.

The floodwaters deposited him downstream in a boulder-strewn field, where he lay pinned down for two days by rocks and debris.

"I was shouting for help all the time, but no one came. I don't know what happened to (my family). Perhaps they are all dead," said Agang, who was finally rescued by local residents early Thursday.

Rescuers were still depositing unidentified corpses at a government yard in the centre of town Thursday, near a gymnasium packed with scores of homeless typhoon victims lying on mats on the wet, muddy floor.

Most houses and buildings in the town were flattened by boulders and logs that rolled down the mountainside, and the ground was carpeted with sludge.

Shell-shocked survivors scrabbled through the rubble to find anything that could be recovered, as relatives searched for missing family members among the newly arrived body bags delivered by soldiers.

"We expect to retrieve more bodies today," said Francisco Macalipay, a Philippine army soldier who commanded the truck delivering the bodies.

He said rescuers were struggling to reach villages amid the destroyed roads and wrecked bridges, but finding corpses was hardly a problem.

"Just let your nose lead you to them," he told AFP, referring to the overpowering stench of dead bodies everywhere.

Rescuers were also digging through the rubble of the town's clinic to try and find medicines and medical equipment that could be used, but instead found another corpse.

"In a week's time I'm sure the smell of death will force the survivors to flee the town," Macalipay said.

The government said 325 people were confirmed dead but 379 people are still missing and 179,000 people were left homeless by the strongest typhoon to reach the Philippines this year.

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