Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Earth Science News .




FLORA AND FAUNA
A novel battleground for plant-pathogen interactions
by Staff Writers
Norwich, UK (SPX) Mar 18, 2014


File image.

Scientists at The Sainsbury Laboratory in Norwich, with collaborators at Michigan State University and the University of Illinois, have unveiled a new way in which plants perceive pathogens to activate immunity.

They also show how pathogens inhibit the mechanism to cause disease. It was previously only associated with other processes in mammalian cells.

When plants detect microbial molecules, they trigger immune responses to prevent disease. Although several plant immune receptors for these microbial molecules are known, how they are activated once the microbe is recognised is not well understood.

In a study published this week in the journal Science, the scientists found that phosphorylation of an amino acid called tyrosine - phosphorylation being a process that can turn molecules on or off - is key for activating plant immune receptors. This mechanism is already known to play an essential role in the activation of mammalian receptors, and its mis-regulation is often linked to important chronic diseases.

The current study shows for the first time that the modification occurs in plant immune receptors as well.

"This finding opens the door to improving crop disease resistance as we can investigate ways to optimise how plants recognise pathogenic microbes," says Professor Cyril Zipfel.

"It also provides a new link between our understanding of cellular signalling in plant and animal cells."

In the same study, the researchers discovered that pathogenic bacteria use an enzyme secreted within plant cells to derail the plant's immune response. They use an enzyme to remove tyrosine phosphorylation from immune receptors, quelling the plant's signalling mechanisms. Inhibiting the immune response allows bacteria to cause disease.

"Our research highlights a battle between hosts and pathogens to take control of an important mechanism," said first author Dr Alberto Macho from The Sainsbury Laboratory.

"Control over this mechanism to activate immune receptors determines whether a plant stays healthy or suffers from disease," he says.

.


Related Links
Norwich BioScience Institutes
Darwin Today At TerraDaily.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





FLORA AND FAUNA
Rallies in S.Africa to save the king of beasts
Cape Town (AFP) March 15, 2014
Wildlife campaigners joined rallies around South Africa Saturday in an international push to protect the lion and save the king of beasts from being raised in cages for "canned hunting". In Cape Town, South African archbishop and Nobel peace laureate Desmond Tutu gave his support to the rally with a prayer read by his daughter Mpho, calling for success in "saving all wildlife, but especiall ... read more


FLORA AND FAUNA
Safety lapses rapped after US nuclear plant fire

Contaminated Fukushima water may be dumped as problems mount

Fukushima: three years on and still a long road ahead

31 dead, nine missing in China lorry blast

FLORA AND FAUNA
Getting rid of bad vibrations

A brake for spinning molecules

Researchers Describe Oxygen's Different Shapes

MUSE Envisions Mining "Big Code" to Improve Software Reliability and Construction

FLORA AND FAUNA
Global food trade can alleviate water scarcity

Global powers sign declaration on sustainable fishing

New Statistical Models Could Lead to Better Predictions of Ocean Patterns

Water-rich gem points to vast 'oceans' beneath the Earth

FLORA AND FAUNA
The Frozen Truth about Glaciers, Climate Change and Our Future

Global warming a concern at Chile's penguin paradise

Melting away: vanishing ice warning for 'Africa's Alps'

NASA Data Sheds New Light on Changing Greenland Ice

FLORA AND FAUNA
Incentives needed to improve grain markets in India

Success of new bug-fighting approach may vary from field to field

Crop intensification as a long-term solution to African food shortages

New bioinsecticide can help control banana plantation pest

FLORA AND FAUNA
Torrential rains kill 32 in South Africa in two weeks

Pre-dawn quake jolts jittery Los Angeles

Earthquakes Caused by Clogged Magma a Warning Sign of Eruption

Philippine Catholics make lifelong sacrifice after typhoon

FLORA AND FAUNA
Chinese nationals held in Nigeria for illegal fishing

What sculpted Africa's margin?

South Sudan intercepts 'mislabelled' UN weapons shipment

Up to 12 'terrorists' in Mali killed by French forces

FLORA AND FAUNA
Stirring the simmering 'designer baby' pot

Empathy chimpanzees offer is key to understanding human engagement

Natural selection has altered the appearance of Europeans over the past 5,000 years

'Seeing' bodies with sound (no sight required)




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.