Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




EARLY EARTH
Ancient life 're-evolves' in Georgia lab
by Staff Writers
Atlanta (UPI) Jul 11, 2012


disclaimer: image is for illustration purposes only

Georgia Tech researchers say they've resurrected a 500-million-year-old gene from bacteria and inserted it into modern-day Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria.

The resurrected bacterium has been growing for more than 1,000 generations, providing scientists a chance to observe evolution in action, the university announced Wednesday.

"This is as close as we can get to rewinding and replaying the molecular tape of life," scientist Betul Kacar said of the effort, dubbed paleo-experimental evolution. "The ability to observe an ancient gene in a modern organism as it evolves within a modern cell allows us to see whether the evolutionary trajectory once taken will repeat itself or whether a life will adapt following a different path."

The researchers began by determining the ancient genetic sequence of Elongation Factor-Tu (EF-Tu), an essential protein in E. coli. After achieving the difficult task of replacing the modern gene in E. coli with the ancient gene in the correct chromosomal order and position, Kacar produced eight identical bacterial strains and allowed "ancient life" to re-evolve.

The bacteria composed of both modern and ancient genes survived, but grew about two times slower than its counterpart composed of only modern genes, he said.

"The altered organism wasn't as healthy or fit as its modern-day version, at least initially, and this created a perfect scenario that would allow the altered organism to adapt and become more fit as it accumulated mutations with each passing day," Kacar said.

After 500 generations, the scientists sequenced the genomes of all eight lineages and found that not only did the fitness levels increase to nearly modern-day levels, some of the altered lineages actually became healthier than their modern counterpart.

The ancient gene had not yet mutated to become more similar to its modern form, they said, but rather the bacteria found a new evolutionary trajectory to adapt.

The finding could answer the question of whether an organism's history limits its future and evolution always leads to a single, defined point, or whether evolution has multiple solutions to a given problem, Kacar said.

.


Related Links
Explore The Early Earth at TerraDaily.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





EARLY EARTH
Multiple proxy datasets can clarify ancient climate regimes
University Park PA (SPX) Jul 04, 2012
Tree ring and oxygen isotope data from the U.S. Pacific Northwest do not provide the same information on past precipitation, but rather than causing a problem, the differing results are a good thing, according to a team of geologists. The researchers are trying to understand the larger spatial patterns and timing of drought in the arid and semiarid areas of the American West. "We generally ... read more


EARLY EARTH
Japan govt, media colluded on nuclear: Nobel winner

Japan pushes ASEAN to lift export restrictions

Report faults Fukushima response

Fukushima was 'man-made' disaster: Japanese probe

EARLY EARTH
The Day Information Went Global

Asian firms to pay $571 mn more in US LCD case

ESA's Clean Space targets orbital debris and greener environment

Metamolecules that switch handedness at light-speed

EARLY EARTH
Work resumes at huge Amazon dam site

Australia's mining boom may doom Barrier Reef

New research finds increased growth responsible for color changes in coral reefs

Trigger for past rapid sea level rise discovered

EARLY EARTH
Arctic warming linked to combination of reduced sea ice and global atmospheric warming

Argentina court upholds glacier protections against mining

Study: Wrong diet doomed 1912 polar try

Scientists to produce first 3-D models of Arctic sea ice

EARLY EARTH
Climate change means stressed cows may have less milk

Sustainability of rice landscapes in South East Asia threatened

Ancient domesticated remains are oldest in southern Africa

France sends emergency anti-locust aid

EARLY EARTH
Fabio becomes fifth hurricane of Pacific season

Hurricane Emilia weakens in Pacific

Russian flood victims pick through damage

Russia mourns flood dead as questions mount

EARLY EARTH
Liberia leader warns of new wars without arms deal

Sahel army chiefs meet on Mali crisis

War vets threaten Angola elections over unpaid pensions

Mali to form 1,200-strong elite force to protect transition

EARLY EARTH
Native American populations descend from three key migrations

Seabirds studied for clues to human aging

Hong Kong's land shortage forces bereaved to sea

Diet of early human relative Australopithecus shows surprises




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement