Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




WHALES AHOY
Australia hits out at Japan at whale research launch
by Staff Writers
Sydney (AFP) Oct 4, 2012


Australian Environment Minister Tony Burke Thursday hit out at Japan's "alleged" scientific whaling as researchers hailed the testing of new acoustic tracking technology for the endangered blue whale.

Burke was given a demonstration of the science in the city of Hobart, where he applauded the innovation and dedication of those working to find out more about the threatened species -- the largest animal that has ever lived.

"Blue whales are under threat of extinction and improved scientific knowledge will help in the conservation and recovery of the species," he said of a creature that can grow to 31 metres (102 feet).

"This research reinforces Australia's commitment to non-lethal research of whales. This contrasts with Japan's so-called 'scientific whaling' where the alleged research begins with a harpoon.

"This breakthrough project again shows you don't have to kill a whale to study it."

Commercial whaling is banned under an international treaty but Japan has since 1987 used a loophole to carry out "lethal research" on the creatures in the name of science.

Australian Antarctic scientists successfully tested the technology to track and locate scores of blue whales hundreds of kilometres away by eavesdropping on the elusive animals' resonating song.

By using sound rather than sight to initially detect them, the scientists significantly improved the likelihood of finding and counting whales in the vast Southern Ocean.

The research is part of an Australian-led international project to estimate the abundance, distribution and behaviour of the species that was decimated in the early 1900s when whaling killed approximately 250,000 animals.

Around 10,000 are now believed to populate the world's oceans.

To test the technology, a team of scientists deployed directional sonobuoys in the northern Bass Strait in January and March this year.

Team leader Mike Double said that over 20 days there were 103 sightings.

"While blue whales are the largest animals on earth, growing up to 31 metres long, they're still very difficult to find in a vast ocean and we know very little about them," Double said.

"The real-time passive acoustic tracking system was highly effective at picking up their low frequency calls from hundreds of kilometres of away, thus maximising our chance of locating them."

The sonobuoys allowed researchers to record more than 500 hours of audio including more than 20,000 blue whale vocalisations.

Once the whales were located they were photographed and biopsied for further identification.

The technology will now be used in the Antarctic Blue Whale Project, which will estimate their abundance and migration patterns in January next year.

.


Related Links
Follow the Whaling Debate






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WHALES AHOY
Indonesians hack into beached whales in mass stranding
Savu, Indonesia (AFP) Oct 2, 2012
Locals on a remote island in eastern Indonesia on Tuesday cut up several dead pilot whales for food after a mass stranding that killed at least 41 of the mammals, an official said. A total of 44 pilot whales beached themselves late Monday on the island of Savu in East Nusa Tenggara province, where there is a culture of whale hunting for consumption. "Locals have hacked into around 11 wha ... read more


WHALES AHOY
All 18 children confirmed dead in China landslide

Hong Kong mourns victims of boat tragedy

Argentine police protest after giant pay error

Hong Kong seeks answers after deadly ferry crash

WHALES AHOY
Latin lithium output mired in controversy

ISS to Dodge Astro-Junk

GSAT-10 is a success but ISRO needs to advance its Launch Capabilities

Raytheon and PACAF expand the reach of realistic training environments

WHALES AHOY
The chemical memory of seawater

Study: Wetlands drove birth of cities

Now in Science: It's not too late for troubled fisheries

White shark diets vary with age and among individuals

WHALES AHOY
Australian tycoon fined for Arctic party cruise

Study: Arctic warming faster than before

Rudolph unfed loathes rain, dear

Melting Arctic ice cap at record low

WHALES AHOY
New technologies advance livestock genomics for agricultural and biomedical uses

Superweeds linked to rising herbicide use in GM crops

Too Little Nitrogen May Restrain Carbon Storage Capability Of Plants

Tadpole Shrimp a New Rice Pest in the Midsouth

WHALES AHOY
Typhoon Maliksi nearing Japan's northeast

Nigeria seasonal floods kill 148: Red Cross

Powerful typhoon hits Japan mainland

Typhoon Jelawat on course to hit mainland Japan

WHALES AHOY
Poor but at peace, Mozambique marks 20 years since civil war

Nigerian college says massacre not linked to campus vote

Nigeria seeks to end the curse of unfinished projects

Ivory Coast opens first major trial of soldiers in political crisis

WHALES AHOY
Last speaker of 'fisherfolk' dialect dies

Compelling evidence that brain parts evolve independently

Anti-aging pill being developed

Human Brains Develop Wiring Slowly, Differing from Chimpanzees




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement