Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Earth Science News .




CLIMATE SCIENCE
Australian climate on 'steroids' after hottest summer
by Staff Writers
Sydney (AFP) March 4, 2013


Australia's weather went "on steroids" over a summer that saw an unprecedented heatwave, bushfires and floods, the climate chief said Monday, warning that global warming would only make things worse.

The Bureau of Meteorology has confirmed the three summer months ending February 28 were the hottest season ever recorded in Australia, leading the government's Climate Commission to label it the "Angry Summer" in a new report.

"The Australian summer over 2012 and 2013 has been defined by extreme weather events across much of the continent, including record-breaking heat, severe bushfires, extreme rainfall and damaging flooding," the report said.

"Extreme heatwaves and catastrophic bushfire conditions during the 'Angry Summer' were made worse by climate change."

The agency's chief commissioner Tim Flannery said the summer had been one of extremes, and was in some ways like an athlete who improves their baseline performance by taking steroids.

"The same thing is happening with our climate system," he told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

"As it warms up we're getting fewer cold days and cold events and many, many more record hot events. So it is -- in effect it's a climate on steroids is what we're seeing."

Australia experienced its hottest ever average national maximum temperature on January 7 of 40.30 degrees Celsius (104.5 Fahrenheit), while 44 sites, including Sydney and Hobart, recorded all-time high temperatures in the summer.

The report said there have only been 21 days in 102 years where the average maximum temperature for the whole of Australia has exceeded 39 Celsius and eight of these happened in the summer just gone.

The Climate Commission said it was "highly likely" that extreme hot weather would become even more frequent and severe in Australia, and around the globe, over the coming decades.

"There is little doubt that these events will continue to become worse, the hottest temperature will become hotter, of longer duration and more frequent," report author Will Steffen told reporters.

"This is virtually certain because of the extra heat that is in the atmosphere."

Steffen said the data proved that climate change "is not some hypothetical thing that will occur in the future, the climate has actually changed".

In addition to the heatwave, Australia also experienced dangerous bushfires in several states, including New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania where more than 100 homes were lost in January.

Later that month, ex-tropical cyclone Oswald brought extreme rainfall over the east coast to Queensland and New South Wales, resulting in severe flooding in many areas.

Flannery said many communities, such as those in flood-prone parts of Queensland which were still recovering from an epic 2011 deluge, were experiencing a sense of exhaustion from dealing with weather events.

"And we're seeing the actual costs now of inaction, of global inaction to deal with this problem," he said.

.


Related Links
Climate Science News - Modeling, Mitigation Adaptation






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





CLIMATE SCIENCE
Scientist play down 'tipping point' theory
Adelaide, Australia (UPI) Feb 28, 2013
A doomsday-like scenario of sudden, irreversible change to the Earth's ecology - a tipping point - is not supported by science, Australian researchers say. Writing in the journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution, scientists from the University of Adelaide, along with U.S. and British colleagues, argue that global-scale ecological tipping points are unlikely and that ecological change o ... read more


CLIMATE SCIENCE
Living through a tornado does not shake optimism

Japan riled by WHO's Fukushima cancer warning

Chernobyl plant building to be covered

Ongoing repairs keep Statue of Liberty closed

CLIMATE SCIENCE
SimCity rebuilt for modern life

Taiwan turns plastic junk into blankets, dolls

Fukushima raised cancer risk near plant: WHO

Ancient Egyptian pigment points to new security ink technology

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Shark fin-hungry China drives 'chaotic' fishing in Indonesia

EU Council agrees to limit fish discards

Ship noise makes crabs get crabby

Maps depict potential worldwide coral bleaching by 2056

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Frostbitten British explorer Fiennes returns home

Caves point to thawing of Siberia

Fiennes's evacuation from Antarctica under way

Data paper describes Antarctic biodiversity data gathered by 90 expeditions since 1956

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Fighting GM crop vandalism with a government-protected research site

Improving climate protection in agriculture

Study provides insights into plant evolution

Invention opens the way to packaging that monitors food freshness

CLIMATE SCIENCE
At least eight dead in Ecuador floods: officials

AFP pictures show then and now of tsunami

6.9-magnitude quake hits off Russian far east: USGS

'Lucky' Australians dodge cyclone's worst

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Independence won, freedom yet to come for South Sudan

Outside View: Kenyan democracy

Amnesty International accuses I. Coast army of abuses

Regional leaders sign peace deal for eastern DR Congo

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Walker's World: The time for women

Human cognition depends upon slow-firing neurons

Blueprint for an artificial brain

Early human burials varied widely but most were simple




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement