. Earth Science News .

Brazil says Amazon deforestation down to lowest level
by Staff Writers
Brasilia (AFP) Dec 5, 2011

Brazil said Monday that the pace of deforestation in its Amazon region fell to its lowest level since authorities began monitoring the world's largest tropical rainforest.

The head of the National Institute of Space Research (INPE), Gilberto Camara, said deforestation dropped to 6,238 square kilometers (2,408 square miles), between August 2010 and July this year, down 11 percent compared with the same period in 2009-20100.

"It's the lowest deforestation rate measured since INPE began its monitoring in 1988," Camara told a press conference.

"It's a great victory for Brazil. It's the lowest deforestation rate. The Amazon is a great instrument for carbon sequestration," one of the tools to combat global warming, said Aloizio Mercadante, the minister of science and technology.

Still, the area deforested in the year ending in July is four times the size of Sao Paulo, Brazil's largest city, according to the state Agencia Brasil.

Between August 2009 and July 2010, the Brazilian Amazon lost 7,000 square kilometers (2,700 square miles) of rain forest, until then the smallest loss recorded.

Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon reached a historic peak of 27,700 square kilometers (10,700 square miles) in 2003-2004.

Monday's announcement came a day before the Brazilian Senate was due to adopt a reform of forestry legislation which could reduce the protected area.

The bill, which would have to be approved by the Chamber of Deputies, has the backing of Brazil's powerful agribusiness sector.

The current forestry code, which dates back to 1965, limits the use of lands for farming and mandates that up to 80 percent of the Amazon remain intact.

Authorities say key reasons for Amazon deforestation are fires, the advance of agriculture and stockbreeding and illegal trafficking in timber and minerals.

Related Links
Forestry News - Global and Local News, Science and Application

Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
Buy Advertising Editorial Enquiries


. Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Mozambique's new forests may not be as green as they seem
Maputo (AFP) Dec 4, 2011
Foreign companies are spending billions of dollars to plant forests in Mozambique, but conservationists fear the investments aren't as good for the environment as they might initially seem. Mozambique has about 400,000 square kilometres (155,000 square miles) of largely untouched forests, an area larger than Germany that covers half of the country, making it a prime target in the African lan ... read more

Swiss Re estimates Thai floods cost at $600 mn

Fukushima radioactive water leaked to Pacific: TEPCO

Web helps Bangkok's flood-hit pets find relief

Workers at Japan nuclear plant recall tsunami desperation

Japan baby formula shows radiation contamination

Dell abandons Android tablet in US

Proton beam experiments open new areas of research

Microsoft adds voice search to Xbox Live

Genetic buzzer-beater genes may save fish

Australian fish adapts to hotter waters: study

Mekong nations to meet on controversial Laos dam

Danube's near-record lows strangle shipping

Abrupt permafrost thaw increases climate threat

Simultaneous ice melt in Antarctic and Arctic

Scientists confirm Himalayan glacial melting

'Record-setting' change in warming Arctic: report

Plant seeds protect their genetic material against dehydration

Fake Italian organic food sold around Europe: police

Massive roof farm planned for Berlin

World Grain Production Down, But Recovering

No end to eruptions at Ecuador's Tungurahua volcano

Hundreds of houses collapse in China quake

Thailand floods a 'wake-up' call for Asia: ADB

Pakistan most affected by climate change

US troops deploy in LRA rebel hunt: Uganda army

Tough hunt for Lord's Resistance Army in central Africa

Liberia's Nobel Peace Laureate holds peace jamboree

S. Sudan battles to transform guerrilla army

Lighting the way to understanding the brain

Making Collective Wisdom Wiser

Scientists Uncover New Role for Gene in Maintaining Steady Weight

Malaysia tribes struggle with modern problems


The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2012 - Space Media Network. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement