Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




EPIDEMICS
Breakthrough in long-lasting AIDS drugs in monkeys
by Staff Writers
Washington (AFP) March 05, 2014


A single shot of antiretroviral drugs protected lab monkeys from the AIDS virus for weeks, according to two US trials released on Tuesday that open the way to tests on humans.

In separate work, two teams of virologists found that monkeys which received a monthly injection of a prototype drug were completely shielded from the simian equivalent of HIV.

The research builds on previous trials showing that people who take a small daily doses of antiretroviral drugs can slash their risk of being infected by an HIV-positive partner by more than 90 percent.

But this protection was far lower when participants failed to take the drugs each day, highlighting the need for a monthly or quarterly injection to avert the problem.

In one of the studies, conducted at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), researchers gave a monthly shot of an experimental, delayed-effect antiretroviral drug called GSK744 to six female monkeys.

Twice a week they inserted into their vagina a liquid containing a human-simian immunodeficiency virus to simulate their having had intercourse with an infected male.

None of the females treated with GSK744 became infected, but six from a control group that were treated with a placebo all became infected quickly.

The other researchers, from the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center at the Rockefeller University in New York, tested the same drug on 15 monkeys, but this time exposing them to the risk of anal infection. The results were identical -- none of the treated animals was infected, but all those on placebo were infected.

A first clinical trial with 175 people is expected to begin later this year in the United States, Brazil, South Africa and Malawi with GSK744, which was developed by the British pharmaceutical firm GlaxoSmithKline.

The data was presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, in Boston.

.


Related Links
Epidemics on Earth - Bird Flu, HIV/AIDS, Ebola






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





EPIDEMICS
Early warning system for epidemics
Karlsruhe, Germany (SPX) Feb 26, 2014
The environment has an impact on our health. Preventing epidemics relies on activating the right counter-measures, and scientists are now trying to find out how better use of forecasting can help. The EU's EO2HEAVEN project developed a risk map for correlating environmental and health data in order to identify where a disease may break out next. The concept will be on show at Booth E40 in Hall 9 ... read more


EPIDEMICS
UN report sees $1.45 tn global warming cost: media

Corpses still being found in Philippine typhoon zone

Tunisian navy 'rescues 98 sub-Saharan migrants'

Nepal government to set up contact office at Mt. Qomolangma base camp

EPIDEMICS
New formula to calculate hue improves accuracy of color analysis

Ultra-fast laser spectroscopy lights way to understanding new materials

Waterloo physicists solve 20-year-old debate surrounding glassy surfaces

A Molecular Ballet under the X-ray Laser

EPIDEMICS
Global warming felt to deepest reaches of ocean

We want to save water, but do we know how?

The surface of the sea is a sink for nitrogen oxides at night

A "shark's eye" view: Witnessing the life of a top predator

EPIDEMICS
NASA Satellite Sees Great Freeze Over Great Lakes

Native Americans lived in Bering Strait for millennia: study

Ancestors of America's original people lived on long-gone land bridge

Alaska mine could be blocked to save salmon fisheries

EPIDEMICS
Homogeneity of food has serious implications for farming and nutrition

Bison ready for new pastures?

New invasive species breakthrough sparks interest around the world

Food production in the northeastern US may need to change if climate does

EPIDEMICS
Flood cost in EU may double by 2050: study

European flood risk could double by 2050

Volcanoes, including Mount Hood in the US, can quickly become active

What has happened to the tsunami debris from Japan?

EPIDEMICS
What sculpted Africa's margin?

Little hope for C.Africa Muslims ahead of French president visit

Kenya boosts airport defence, warning of Islamist threat

Somalia: Resurgent al-Shabaab targets president 'dead or alive'

EPIDEMICS
Cambodia's floating villages face uncertain future

Research reveals first glimpse of brain circuit that helps experience to shape perception

Baylor Sheds New Light on the Habitat of Early Apes

Oldest fortified settlement in North America discovered in Georgia




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.