Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. Earth Science News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



WOOD PILE
Cambodia to use helicopter gunships in logging crackdown
by Staff Writers
Phnom Penh (AFP) Feb 25, 2016


Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen on Thursday said he had authorised the use of helicopter gunships to crack down on rampant illegal logging in an effort to curb deforestation.

Hun Sen recently appointed armed forces deputy commander-in-chief General Sao Sokha and the head of the military police to curb illegal logging and timber smuggling.

The trade, lubricated by violence and bribery of forestry officials and border guards, has eviscerated one quarter of the country's forests in a generation.

Hun Sen has been in power in throughout that time, but conservationists say he has made little headway in reducing illegal logging despite trumpeting several crackdowns.

"We recognise that deforestation must be punished. I gave two helicopters to Sao Sokha," Hun Sen said Thursday.

"I have authorised them to fire rockets."

Hun Sen said his government had also confiscated nearly one million hectares (2.5 million acres) of land from private firms in an effort to stop illegal forest clearance.

He said the trade was being conducted under the noses of officials, asking: "The logs are so big, where are the eyes of police, military police, forestry administration and the ministry of environment? Or are you guys just the same as them?"

In the last few decades a surge in illegal logging has contributed to a sharp drop in Cambodia's forest cover, which fell from 73 percent in 1990 to 57 percent in 2010, according to the United Nations.

Probes into the lucrative trade are steeped with risk and several high-profile killings of activists trying to expose the rampant spread of logging have blighted the kingdom in recent years.

A forest ranger and a policeman who were investigating illegal logging in Cambodia were killed in November and at least 10 people, including a soldier, were arrested over the murders.

In its haste to develop the impoverished nation, the government has been criticised for allowing firms to clear hundreds of thousands of hectares of forest land -- including in protected zones -- for everything from rubber and sugar cane plantations to hydropower dams.

Rights groups and environmental watchdogs have linked many of these concessions to rampant illegal logging, and say armed government forces often act as security guards for offending companies.

Environmentalists met Hun Sen's latest order with scepticism.

Ouch Leng, a Cambodian forest activist, said Hun Sen had repeatedly launched similar crackdowns "but the illegal logging has continued".

"Cambodia has lost nearly all of its forest," he said.

Demand for rare woods from wealthy Chinese and Vietnamese is believed to have spurred much of the deforestation in the Mekong region.


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
Forestry News - Global and Local News, Science and Application






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
WOOD PILE
Increasing drought threatens almost all US forests
Washington DC (SPX) Feb 23, 2016
Forests nationwide are feeling the heat from increasing drought and climate change, according to a new study by scientists from 14 research institutions. "Over the last two decades, warming temperatures and variable precipitation have increased the severity of forest droughts across much of the continental United States," said James Clark, lead author of the study and an environmental scie ... read more


WOOD PILE
Brazil police charge seven in Samarco mine deaths: reports

More Austrian troops to deal with migrant inflow

Taiwan vows new safety laws after quake disaster

Contested waters in NATO's new Aegean migrant mission

WOOD PILE
New research introduces 'pause button' for boiling

Mystery of Dracula orchids' mimicry is unraveled with a 3-D printer

Shrinking 3-D technology for comfortable smart phone viewing

Modified laser cutter prints 3-D objects from powder

WOOD PILE
Sea level rise in 20th century was fastest in 3,000 years, Rutgers-led study finds

Barrier Reef at greater risk than thought: study

Sea-level rise past and future: Robust estimates for coastal planners

Researchers sequence seagrass genome, unlocking valuable resource

WOOD PILE
Study of tundra soil demonstrates vulnerability of ecosystem to climate warming

Ice age blob of warm ocean water discovered south of Greenland

Australian icebreaker runs aground in Antarctica

Antarctic ice sheet is more vulnerable to CO2 than expected

WOOD PILE
New wheat genetic advancements aimed at yield enhancement

PM tells drought-stricken Thailand to cut rice production

Time of day can impact spray

Chinese buyer for Australia's largest dairy farm business

WOOD PILE
Fiji cyclone death toll rises to 42: official

Cyclone death toll hits 29 as Fiji eyes long clean-up

Christchurch commemorates devastating quake

Death toll rises as Fiji cleans up after 'strongest ever' cyclone

WOOD PILE
Voice of China: Beijing seeks African friends and influence

Kenya army says it killed Shebab intelligence chief

Three soldiers get life for I.Coast military chief's murder

Saving the wildlife 'miracle' of Congo's Garamba park

WOOD PILE
Easter Island not destroyed by war, analysis of 'spear points' shows

Neanderthals and modern H. sapiens crossbred over 100,000 years ago

Neanderthals mated with modern humans much earlier than previously thought

Modern 'Indiana Jones' on mission to save antiquities




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement