Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Earth Science News .




FROTH AND BUBBLE
China climate negotiator laments 'severe' pollution
by Staff Writers
Beijing (AFP) Nov 05, 2013


Girl, 8, is China's youngest lung cancer case
Beijing (AFP) Nov 05, 2013 - An eight-year-old girl has become China's youngest lung cancer patient, reports said, with doctors blaming pollution as the direct cause of her illness.

The girl, whose name was not given, lives near a major road in the eastern province of Jiangsu, said Xinhuanet, the website of China's official news agency.

It quoted Jie Fengdong, a doctor at Jiangsu Cancer Hospital in Nanjing, as saying she had been exposed to harmful particles and dust over a long period of time.

Lung cancer cases among children are extremely rare, with the average age for diagnosis at about 70, according to the American Cancer Society.

But the incidence of the disease has skyrocketed in China as the country's rapid development has brought with it deteriorating air quality, particularly in urban areas.

Lung cancer deaths in China have multiplied more than four times over the past 30 years, according to Beijing's health ministry. Cancer is now the leading cause of death in the smog-ridden capital.

The report of the eight-year-old girl's diagnosis comes after choking smog enveloped the northeastern city of Harbin two weeks ago, bringing flights and ground transport to a standstill and forcing schools to shut for several days, with visibility in some areas reduced to less than 50 metres.

At the height of the smog, the city's levels of PM2.5 -- the smallest, most dangerous type of airborne particle -- reached 1,000 micrograms per cubic metre, 40 times the World Health Organization's recommended standard.

High levels of PM2.5 have been linked to health problems including lung cancer and heart disease.

China's top negotiator at international climate talks said on Tuesday that air pollution in his own country -- the world's biggest carbon emitter -- is harming its citizens.

"China indeed is suffering from severe air pollution," said Xie Zhenhua, vice chairman of the National Development and Reform Commission, the top economic planning body.

Smoggy conditions have "now become the norm which has severely affected the mental and physical health of the Chinese people", he added -- but voiced hope for improvement in the next decade.

Xie, speaking to reporters before global climate talks in Poland next week, attributed China's air problems to the country's "obsolete development model", its "unreasonable industrial and energy structure" and discharge of pollutants by some companies "in a very extensive way".

The root cause, he added, is the "use of fossil fuels".

Pollution is becoming a major source of public anger in China, and authorities vowed in September to reduce levels of atmospheric pollutants in Beijing and other major cities by as much as 25 percent by 2017 to try to improve their dire air quality.

The government said pollution levels would be cut by slowing the growth of coal consumption so that its share of China's energy sources fell to 65 percent by 2017.

China is the world's biggest coal consumer and is forecast to account for more than half of global demand next year.

Xie said that "in about five to 10 years we will see improvements in our air quality."

Chinese cities have been hit by intense air pollution in recent years, much of it caused by emissions from coal-burning power stations. Levels of small particles known as PM2.5 have reached as high as 40 times World Health Organisation limits this year.

Pollution, which tends to worsen as winter approaches, is also blamed on rapid urbanisation, dramatic economic development and climatic factors.

The bad air has tarnished the image of Chinese cities including Beijing, which saw an almost 15 percent drop in tourist visits during the first half of this year.

Air pollution contributed to 1.2 million premature deaths and 25 million healthy years of life lost in China in 2010, the US-based Health Effects Institute said in March.

The populous northeastern city of Harbin was shrouded in thick smog for several days late last month, with schools and a regional airport shut and poor visibility forcing some ground transport to a halt.

Xie stressed that China remains a "developing country", saying it has only recently reached a per capita GDP of $6,000 and still has about 90 million people living below the poverty line.

"China is also in the process of industrialisation, urbanisation and agricultural modernisation, so we are still in an uphill process," he said, adding: "We face daunting difficulties and challenges ahead."

.


Related Links
Our Polluted World and Cleaning It Up






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





FROTH AND BUBBLE
Gold mining ravages Peru
Washington DC (SPX) Nov 04, 2013
For the first time, researchers have been able to map the true extent of gold mining in the biologically diverse region of Madre De Dios in the Peruvian Amazon. The team combined field surveys with airborne mapping and high-resolution satellite monitoring to show that the geographic extent of mining has increased 400% from 1999 to 2012 and that the average annual rate of forest loss has tripled ... read more


FROTH AND BUBBLE
Space technologies boost disaster reduction int'l co-op

How to Manage Nature's Runaway Freight Trains

Uruguay to pull peacekeepers from Haiti: president

Storm-battered northern Europe slowly gets back to normal

FROTH AND BUBBLE
Plasmonic crystal alters to match light-frequency source

Virtually numbed: Immersive video gaming alters real-life experience

New material for quantum computing discovered out of the blue

Google boss says US data spying is "outrageous"

FROTH AND BUBBLE
Water mark: Los Angeles fetes 100 years of aqueduct

Toxic river a bane to one in eight Argentines

Faroe Islands launches fish fight with EU at WTO

New study suggests coral reefs may be able to adapt to moderate climate change

FROTH AND BUBBLE
Dutch plead in court for release of Greenpeace activists

NASA Begins Airborne Campaign to Map Greenland Ice Sheet Summer Melt

Thawing Permafrost: The speed of coastal erosion in Eastern Siberia has nearly doubled

Greenpeace says Russia moving jailed activists to St Petersburg

FROTH AND BUBBLE
First GMO rice to be launched in Philippines in 2016: researchers

Study challenges soil testing for potassium and the fertilizer value of potassium chloride

Plant production could decline as climate change affects soil nutrients

Drink it while you can, as wine shortage looms: study

FROTH AND BUBBLE
Improving earthquake early warning systems for California and Taiwan

Guatemala warns pilots of ash plume from volcano

Tropical Storm Sonia weakens after hitting Mexico

Hundreds evacuated as Indonesia volcano erupts

FROTH AND BUBBLE
African leaders discuss rapid-deployment emergency force

Hong Kong firm debuts in Africa with $104m S.African deal

Tanzania halts anti-poaching drive after abuse claims

China backs African bid to suspend ICC Kenya case

FROTH AND BUBBLE
Study: Humans made sophisticated stone tools earlier than thought

Did hard-wired fear of snakes drive evolution of human vision?

Hair regeneration method is first to induce new human hair growth

No known hominin is ancestor of Neanderthals and modern humans




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement