Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




CLIMATE SCIENCE
Cities, farms reroute animals seeking cooler climes
by Sandra Hines for UW News
Seattle WA (SPX) Jun 24, 2013


Dark purple marks areas where high densities of animals will need to travel but where they will encounter the most cities, agricultural development and other human-caused barriers. Light yellow marks areas with less human-land uses and where animals should consequently have an easier time moving.

In spite of considerable human development, the southeastern United States region could provide some of the Western Hemisphere's more heavily used thoroughfares for mammals, birds and amphibians on their way to cooler environments in a warming world, according to new research led by the University of Washington.

The region is among half a dozen areas that could experience heavier traffic compared with the average species-movement across the Western Hemisphere in response to a warming climate. The estimate in southeastern states, for example, is up to 2.5 times the average amount of movement across North and South America.

Other areas that could see pronounced animal movements are northeastern North America, including around the Great Lakes and north into Canada; southeastern Brazil, home to both the species-rich Atlantic Forest and major cities such as Sao Paulo with its 11 million residents; and the Amazon Basin.

The basin, stretching across seven South American countries, could have the greatest animal movements, up to 17 times the average across the hemisphere. The high northern latitudes also show pronounced species movements, not because of animals currently found there but because of an expected influx of species.

While previous studies mapped where animals need to move to find climates that suit them, this is the first broad-scale study to also consider how animals might travel when confronted with cities, large agricultural areas and other human related barriers, according to Joshua Lawler, UW associate professor of environmental and forestry sciences and lead author of a paper appearing June 19 online in Ecology Letters.

The golden mouse, ornate chorus frog and southern cricket frog - three of the species that will likely be on the move in southeastern U.S. - were among the nearly 3,000 mammals, birds and amphibians the scientists included in their study, nearly half of all such animals in the Western Hemisphere.

"We took into account that many animals aren't just going to be able to head directly to areas with climates that suit them," Lawler said. "Some animals, particularly small mammals and amphibians, are going to have to avoid highways, agricultural development and the like. We also took into consideration major natural barriers such as the Great Lakes in North America and the Amazon River in South America."

Identifying where large numbers of species will need to move can help guide land use and conservation planning. Many of the animals moving southward through central Argentina will be funneled by agriculture and development through the more intact parts of the Gran Chaco region and into the Sierras de Cordoba and the Andes mountains.

Similarly, the southern Appalachian Mountains in the southeastern U.S. are projected to act as a conduit for species moving northward in response to climate change.

"These findings highlight the importance of the natural corridors that exist in these places - corridors that likely warrant more concerted conservation efforts to help species move in response to climate change," Lawler said.

In other places barriers may need to be breached for animals to disperse successfully.

"Southeastern Brazil, for instance, has lots of species that need to move but is a heavily converted landscape. In such places conservation efforts may be needed to reconnect native habitats," Lawler said.

Except for one or two very localized studies, this is the first to project species movements based on both climate change and the constraints of human alterations to the landscape. For the climate component, the researchers took 10 projections of future climate, projected species movements for all 10, then averaged the results.

For the human impacts component, the scientists added cities, agriculture and other landscape barriers to 30-mile-square (50-kilometer-square) cells across the Western Hemisphere.

They applied a technique developed by paper co-author Brad McRae of the Nature Conservancy that's based on how electricity finds the path of least resistance when traveling across circuit boards. In this case, however, the "current" was the various species trying to stream through each cell, and the resistance was the human-made and natural landscape barriers.

The work was supported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Wilburforce Foundation.

The other co-authors are Aaron Ruesch, who earned his master's from the UW and is now with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, and Julian Olden, a UW associate professor of aquatic and fishery sciences.

"The mountainous region from Yellowstone to the Yukon is widely recognized as an important wildlife movement corridor, now our study maps additional pathways across the Western Hemisphere with the potential to shepherd species to safety in a warming future," Olden said.

"Climate change and human land use can interact in complex and region-specific ways to shape the ability of species to persist into the future. This suggests that urban and agriculture lands represent both a conservation challenge and opportunity to help species respond to climate-induced changes in temperature."

.


Related Links
University of Washington
Climate Science News - Modeling, Mitigation Adaptation






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





CLIMATE SCIENCE
Obama to propose 'national plan' on climate change
Washington (AFP) June 22, 2013
US President Barack Obama will give a major speech on climate change Tuesday in which he will propose a "national plan" to curb carbon pollution despite resistance from Congress. Obama has made taking action on climate change a key goal of his second term but will have to rely on the powers of the presidency as the Republican-led House of Representatives would likely block any fresh legislat ... read more


CLIMATE SCIENCE
WIN-T Increment 1 Enables National Guard to Restore Vital Network Communications Following a Disaster

Australia costs from natural disasters to soar: study

Satellite data will be essential to future of groundwater, flood and drought management

China work safety probe finds 'many' problems: official

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Noble gases hitch a ride on hydrous minerals

'Chemical architects' build materials with potential applications in drug delivery and gas storage

Researchers Propose New Method for Achieving Nonlinear Optical Effects

Unexpected behavior of well-known catalysts

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Fiji's Air Pacific bans 'unsustainable' shark fins

Ups-and-downs of Indian monsoon rainfall likely to increase under warming

Looking at sachet water consumption in Ghana

Natural Underwater Springs Show How Coral Reefs Respond to Ocean Acidification

CLIMATE SCIENCE
The rhythm of the Arctic summer

Global cooling as significant as global warming

Warm ocean drives most Antarctic ice shelf loss

Jet stream changes cause climatically exceptional Greenland Ice Sheet melt

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Pesticides tainting traditional China herbs: Greenpeace

Research suggests plants capable of employing quantum physics

Talks on EU agriculture policy reforms in make-or-break stage

African palm oil makers hit back at global 'smear campaign'

CLIMATE SCIENCE
India flood rescue ops intensify, up to 1,000 feared dead

Flooding in Canada forces evacuation in another city

Tropical storm Barry kills three in Mexico

Alberta faces '10-year recovery' after flood: Redford

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Uganda president's son denies plan to succeed father

Africa juggles East and West, as Obama comes to visit

In Ghana's gold country, Chinese miners flee crackdown

DEA boosts fight against West African narco-terrorists

CLIMATE SCIENCE
New frontier for cybersecurity: your body

What do memories look like?

Professor finds prehistoric rock art connected; maps cosmological belief

New research backs theory that genetic 'switches' play big role in human evolution




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement