Earth Science News  





.
CLIMATE SCIENCE
Drought halts shipping on China's Yangtze

by Staff Writers
Beijing (AFP) May 12, 2011
Drought on China's Yangtze river has led to historically low water levels that have forced authorities to halt shipping on the nation's longest waterway, the government and media said Thursday.

The water level along the lower reaches of the river near the city of Wuhan was just above three metres (10 feet) on Thursday, the Chang Jiang Waterway Bureau said on its website.

A day earlier, the bureau closed a 228-kilometre (140-mile) stretch above Wuhan to ocean-going vessels due to shallow water in an effort to prevent the ships from bottoming out.

Further up the river, the massive Three Gorges Dam, the world's biggest hydroelectric project, has discharged more water to alleviate the drought conditions down river, state press reported.

It was not immediately clear if the measures would be effective, as the drought along the middle reaches has sent water levels to their lowest point in five decades, the China Daily said.

At least two ships have been stranded in recent days as dozens of emergency teams have been dispatched to prevent accidents along the middle reaches, where the river has shrunk to an average width of about 150 metres, it said.

According to Wang Jingquan of the Yangtze River Water Resources Committee, damming up the river at the controversial Three Gorges Dam has aggravated the drought by diverting water flow to the lower reaches, the paper said.

The 6,300-kilometre Yangtze is China's longest waterway and is indispensable to the economies of many cities along its route.

The drought has left 400,000 people in Hubei province without drinking water and has threatened nearly 870,000 hectares (2.15 million acres) of farmland in the grain-growing region, the paper said.

October to May is normally the dry season along the river and ocean-going ships are only allowed to go up river past Wuhan at the end of April when the rainy season usually begins, state media said.

"Even though heavy rains are expected in coming months, it's possible they won't raise the water level much," the China Daily quoted Wu Heping, director of the Wuhan waterway bureau, as saying.




Share This Article With Planet Earth
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit
YahooMyWebYahooMyWeb GoogleGoogle FacebookFacebook



Related Links
Climate Science News - Modeling, Mitigation Adaptation



Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
CLIMATE SCIENCE
Texas drought could extend for months
Washington (UPI) Apr 26, 2011
The worst drought to hit Texas in 45 years, which has sparked wildfires consuming 1.5 million acres, could continue to summer and beyond, meteorologists say. Officials with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration say weather models predict the severe drought that has parched the southern United States will continue, ClimateWire reported Tuesday. "Predictions over week ... read more

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  


CLIMATE SCIENCE
Japan SOS mayor vows to save town near nuclear plant

Tornado damage raises building questions

More than 40 injured in China bank blast

Japan to help TEPCO pay nuclear victims

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Lessening the Dangers of Radiation

US judge sides with Kodak in Apple patent dispute

Silver cycle: New evidence for natural synthesis of silver nanoparticles

NIST super-stable laser shines in minivan experiment

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Darfur forum to seek $1.4 billion in water aid: UN

Israel exploiting Jordan Valley: rights group

Iran expert alarmed by 'critical' Caspian Sea pollution

Egyptian PM in Ethiopia for Nile talks

CLIMATE SCIENCE
States set rules on exploiting Arctic wealth

Canada PM's Arctic stand 'frosty rhetoric'

Antarctic icebergs help the ocean take up carbon dioxide

Change is the order of the day in the Arctic

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Drought tolerance in crops: Shutting down the plant's growth inhibition under mild stress

India's top court imposes ban on 'toxic' pesticide

New Strategy Aims to Reduce Agricultural Ammonia

'Liquid smoke' from rice shows potential health benefits

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Spanish seismologist had predicted a quake "shortly"

Spain mourns quake victims

US storms have no bearing on hurricane season

Mississippi Delta braces for historic flooding

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Outside View: Kenya mobile banking network

Burkina Faso ruling party says opposition aiming for coup

Chinese army gives rocket launchers, weapons to Sierra Leone

Disaster-hit Japan will not cut aid to Africa: spokesman

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Ancient rock carvings found in Sudan

Indian brides told to put down their mobile phones

Super-healing researcher follows intuition

No nuts for 'Nutcracker Man'


The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2010 - SpaceDaily. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement