Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. Earth Science News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



WATER WORLD
Ecuador prison for Chinese fishers caught in Galapagos
by Staff Writers
Quito (AFP) Aug 28, 2017


A court in Ecuador sentenced the crew of a Chinese ship caught fishing endangered sharks in the Galapagos marine reserve to prison terms on Sunday.

The Chinese-flagged Fu Yuan Yu Leng 999 was caught within the protected zone on August 13 with 300 tonnes of fish -- including some 6,000 sharks, mostly protected species such as the hammerhead and the bigeye thresher.

The court announced on the third day of the trial against the crew that it was sentencing the ship captain to four years prison for committing an environmental crime with aggravating circumstances.

The ship's three top officers got three years prison, while the 16 other crew members were jailed for one year.

The court also ordered the crew to pay $5.9 million to the Galapagos National Park.

It's unclear if the Chinese crew will appeal the sentence.

"After the enormous indignation we felt, this will definitely compensate for the damage caused because a historic precedent has been set," park director Walter Bustos told AFP upon hearing the sentence.

The 138,000 square-kilometer reserve, a sanctuary for sharks, has been designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage site.

Some 27,000 people live on the 19 Galapagos islands, located in the Pacific some 1,000 kilometers off Ecuador's coastline.

The Galapagos is famous for its unique flora and fauna studied by Charles Darwin as he developed his theory of evolution.

"Zero tolerance for environmental crimes!" tweeted Ecuador's Environment Minister Tarcisio Granizo.

The Chinese ship has been confiscated and will be held in service to the Galapagos park, Granizo said.

Galapagos residents have been protesting what they say is a fleet of 300 Chinese fishing vessels located in international waters just outside the marine reserve.

pld/ch/pg

GALAPAGOS

WATER WORLD
Japanese seaweed is welcome invader on US coasts: study
Miami (AFP) July 17, 2017
A kind of Japanese seaweed that is considered an invasive species in the United States is actually serving an important role in restoring barren and vulnerable coastlines, US researchers said Monday. In many lagoons and estuaries of the North Atlantic, native seagrasses and oyster beds have been "severely reduced," due to global warming, pollution, disease and overharvesting, said the report ... read more

Related Links
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

WATER WORLD
Two landslides kill 30 in China

After Harvey, misery piles on for Texas plant evacuees

Texas flood toll mounts amid chemical blast fears

'Katrina all over again:' New Orleans in solidarity with Houston

WATER WORLD
Clamping down on causality by probing laser cavities

Rare-metals in the Himalayas: The potential world-class treasure

Why does rubbing a balloon on your hair make it stick?

Making 3-D printing safer

WATER WORLD
Decoding coral DNA could help save reefs from extinction

Oil and water can mix under the right conditions, scientists say

Ecuador prison for Chinese fishers caught in Galapagos

Phoenix International receives $23.3M for deep-sea rescue vehicles

WATER WORLD
New findings on the past and future of sea ice cover in the Arctic

Warming the Antarctic 1 C vastly changes seabed life

Climate change pushed songbirds from Bahamas in the wake of the last ice age

Satellite photos reveal gigantic outburst floods

WATER WORLD
Leaf sensors can tell farmers when crops need to be watered

To detoxify soil, just shoot lasers at it, study says

Scientists turn brewing waste into fresh yeast to make more beer

Soybean rust develops 'rolling' epidemics as spores travel north

WATER WORLD
'Tsunami-sunk' Roman ruins discovered in Tunisia

Nigeria floods displace more than 100,000

'Bigger and stronger' storms on the horizon: experts

Texas flood disaster by the numbers

WATER WORLD
DRCongo troops chasing reporter 'force entry' at UN base

Angolans vote as Dos Santos ends 38-year rule

Death toll in SLeone flood disaster reaches 441

Africa Endeavor 2017 communications conference starts in Malawi

WATER WORLD
Ape intelligence research poisoned by human ego, scientists argue

Elderly just as streetwise as young adults, research shows

Farming, cheese, chewing changed human skull shape

Both chimpanzees and humans spontaneously imitate each other's actions




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement