Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Earth Science News .




WHITE OUT
Father dies sheltering girl from Japan blizzard
by Staff Writers
Tokyo (AFP) March 4, 2013


Powerful winter storms blanket central US
Chicago (AFP) March 4, 2013 - Two powerful winter storms blanketed huge swaths of the central United States Monday and threatened to bury much of the northern portion of the country in the coming days.

"It's a pretty good sized mass of storms," said Pat Slattery of the National Weather Service. "It's going to be around for a while."

The first storm was creating blizzard conditions in parts of Montana and North Dakota and was expected to pound parts of the central plains and upper midwest before hitting the Appalachians Tuesday.

A second storm was forming in the Rocky Mountains and was expected to reach the central plains by Monday evening, at which point it would join up with the first storm in a huge mass of biting wind and blowing snow.

The weather service warned that travel would be hazardous or even impossible at the height of the storm, which is expected to reach the heavily populated Chicago area just in time for the morning rush hour on Tuesday and will linger long past the evening rush.

"Accumulation rates of one to 1.5 inches (2.5 to 3.8 centimeters) per hour are possible at times making snow removal difficult and travel extremely dangerous," the Chicago office of the weather service warned.

Up to 10 inches (25 centimeters) of snow were expected in the Windy City by the time the storm passes on Tuesday night.

Wind gusts of up to 50 miles per hour (80 kilometers) were creating huge drifts and whipping up the snow into near-white out conditions in North Dakota and Montana Monday where as much as 15 inches (38 centimeters) of snow was expected.

"Roadways will become drifted shut from blowing and drifting snow," the weather service's Montana office warned.

"If trapped in the blizzard do not leave your car. Disorientation can occur quickly in low temperatures and white out conditions which can lead to a life threatening situation."

The weather service also warned farmers that "newborn livestock will need to be protected against the elements today."

A father froze to death while sheltering his nine-year-old daughter from severe weekend blizzards that swept northern Japan, two years after her mother died, reports said Monday.

Mikio Okada died as he tried to protect his only child Natsune against winds of up to 109 kilometres (68 miles) per hour, as temperatures plunged to minus 6 Celsius (21 Fahrenheit).

Okada was one of at least nine people killed in a spate of snow-related incidents as blizzards swept across Hokkaido island, police said Monday.

The latest confirmed victim was Kuniko Jingi, 76, who was found lying on the street late Saturday. As with many others, she appeared to have perished after leaving her stranded car, a local police officer said.

Okada's body was uncovered by rescuers looking for the pair after relatives raised the alarm. Natsune was wearing her father's jacket and was wrapped in his arms, newspapers and broadcasters said.

The pair had last been heard from at 4 pm on Saturday, after fisherman Okada picked his daughter up from a school where she was being looked after while he was at work.

Okada called his relatives to say his truck had become stranded in the driving snow, which was several metres deep in places. He told them he and Natsune would walk the remaining kilometre, the Yomiuri Shimbun said.

The two were found just 300 metres from the truck at 7 am on Sunday.

Okada was hunched over his daughter, cradling her in his arms and apparently using his body and a warehouse wall to provide shelter, the Yomiuri said.

He had taken his jacket off to give to the child, a broadcaster said.

Rescuers said she was weeping weakly in his arms, the paper said.

The young girl was taken to hospital where she was found to have no serious injuries. Her father was officially pronounced dead by doctors at the same institution near their home at Yubetsu on Hokkaido.

The Yomiuri said Natsune's mother had died two years earlier from an unspecified illness.

The paper quoted neighbours as saying Okada had been a doting father who would often delay the start of his working day to enjoy breakfast with his daughter.

His death came as families all over Japan celebrated Girls' Day, a festival in which they gather at home and decorate houses with dolls.

"He reserved a cake for his only daughter and was looking forward to celebrating Dolls' Festival together," a neighbour told the Yomiuri.

.


Related Links
It's A White Out at TerraDaily.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WHITE OUT
Six people die as blizzards hit northern Japan
Tokyo (AFP) March 3, 2013
At least six people died in a spate of snow-related incidents as blizzards swept across the northern Japanese island of Hokkaido over the weekend, police and news reports said Sunday. A 40-year-old woman and her three teenaged children were found dead late Saturday in a car buried under snow in the town of Nakashibetsu, eastern Hokkaido, a local police spokesman said. They are believed t ... read more


WHITE OUT
Living through a tornado does not shake optimism

Japan riled by WHO's Fukushima cancer warning

Chernobyl plant building to be covered

Ongoing repairs keep Statue of Liberty closed

WHITE OUT
SimCity rebuilt for modern life

Taiwan turns plastic junk into blankets, dolls

Fukushima raised cancer risk near plant: WHO

Ancient Egyptian pigment points to new security ink technology

WHITE OUT
Shark fin-hungry China drives 'chaotic' fishing in Indonesia

EU Council agrees to limit fish discards

Ship noise makes crabs get crabby

Maps depict potential worldwide coral bleaching by 2056

WHITE OUT
Frostbitten British explorer Fiennes returns home

Caves point to thawing of Siberia

Fiennes's evacuation from Antarctica under way

Data paper describes Antarctic biodiversity data gathered by 90 expeditions since 1956

WHITE OUT
Fighting GM crop vandalism with a government-protected research site

Improving climate protection in agriculture

Study provides insights into plant evolution

Invention opens the way to packaging that monitors food freshness

WHITE OUT
At least eight dead in Ecuador floods: officials

AFP pictures show then and now of tsunami

6.9-magnitude quake hits off Russian far east: USGS

'Lucky' Australians dodge cyclone's worst

WHITE OUT
Independence won, freedom yet to come for South Sudan

Outside View: Kenyan democracy

Amnesty International accuses I. Coast army of abuses

Regional leaders sign peace deal for eastern DR Congo

WHITE OUT
Walker's World: The time for women

Human cognition depends upon slow-firing neurons

Blueprint for an artificial brain

Early human burials varied widely but most were simple




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement