Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




WHALES AHOY
Fugitive eco-activist eyes anti-whale battle from afar
by Staff Writers
Los Angeles (AFP) Nov 05, 2013


Fugitive eco-activist Paul Watson is due in a US court this week for his latest legal battle -- but, after 15 months on the run, he says he is happy to leave the high seas clashes to friends in Australia.

The Canadian-born Sea Shepherd founder arrived in California last week more than a year after fleeing arrest in Germany, spending most of the intervening time at sea in the South Pacific and Southern Ocean.

In an interview with AFP the 62-year-old said he expects to take the stand in a Seattle courtroom on Wednesday, to defend himself against accusations of piracy brought by Japanese whalers.

But the white-bearded activist says he does not expect a judge to lift an injunction on him joining Sea Shepherd boats due to leave Australia within weeks for an annual campaign against Japanese whaling vessels.

"I don't believe that the injunction will be lifted, so I don't plan on going on the campaign," said Watson, who is banned from participating along with the Oregon-based Sea Shepherd Conservation Society (SSCS).

"But I'm not particularly concerned about it because Sea Shepherd Australia is quite capable, as they've proven ... to carry out the campaign," he added.

The Australian arm of the environmental group is ready to set sail again on December 1 to disrupt the Japanese whalers, said Watson, known to his loyal supporters as "The Captain."

Sea Shepherd, founded by former Greenpeace activist Watson in 1977, has chased the Japanese fleet hunting whales off Antarctica for several years in a bid to stop the animals being slaughtered.

Japan says it conducts vital scientific research using a loophole in an international ban on whaling, but makes no secret of the fact that the mammals ultimately end up as food.

Watson was arrested in May last year in Frankfurt on a warrant from Costa Rica, where he is wanted on charges stemming from a high-seas confrontation over shark finning in 2002.

He was released on bail after paying a fine, and was ordered to appear before police twice a day. But he skipped bail on July 22, 2012 and fled Germany.

Between then and last week, when he unexpectedly announced his arrival by boat in Los Angeles, Watson said he was mostly at sea -- including from December to March with the Southern Ocean campaign, but only "as an observer."

In Tokyo, Deputy Chief Cabinet Secretary Katsunobu Kato responded to Watson's re-emergence on US soil by saying: "Japan continues to request the captain's arrest."

The eco-activist was not stopped by US immigration or other officials when he entered the country last week.

But he acknowledged that he could yet be arrested. "There's always a possibility," he said, while noting that: "Nobody gets extradited on a trespassing charge, it's political.

"They can try, but the US government is well aware of where I am. If there's any reason to deal with it (being arrested) we'll deal with it. I'm not going to make myself unavailable."

Watson said he thought Japan was pursuing the legal action partly to drain non-profit Sea Shepherd's coffers.

"Basically what they're doing is they're forcing us to spend a lot of money on that, hoping that that will stop us.

"But Sea Shepherd USA has already withdrawn from the campaign, the campaign is under the leadership of Sea Shepherd Australia and the ships are ready to leave on December 1," he said.

The veteran environmentalist, who was granted an Australian visa last week, had another reason to return to the United States, of which he is a citizen.

"It's been 15 months since I've been here. I left the week that my granddaughter was born so I haven't seen her for 15 months. So that was the most important thing about coming back."

.


Related Links
Follow the Whaling Debate






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WHALES AHOY
Bats and whales behave in surprisingly similar ways
Odense, Denmark (SPX) Nov 04, 2013
Sperm whales weigh up to 50 tons, and the smallest bat barely reaches a gram. Nevertheless, the two species share the same success story: They both have developed the ability to use echolocation - a biological sonar - for hunting. Now Danish researchers show that the biosonar of toothed whales and bats share surprisingly many similarities - even though they live in very different environments an ... read more


WHALES AHOY
Space technologies boost disaster reduction int'l co-op

How to Manage Nature's Runaway Freight Trains

Uruguay to pull peacekeepers from Haiti: president

Storm-battered northern Europe slowly gets back to normal

WHALES AHOY
Breakthrough in study of aluminum should yield new technological advances

Gravity and the robot satellite attitude problem

Global IT spending set to recover in 2014

Plasmonic crystal alters to match light-frequency source

WHALES AHOY
The nitrogen puzzle in the oceans

Rising temperatures challenge Salt Lake City's water supply

Water mark: Los Angeles fetes 100 years of aqueduct

Toxic river a bane to one in eight Argentines

WHALES AHOY
Search on for oldest antarctic ice in hunt for ancient climate clues

Stowaways threaten fisheries in the Arctic

The search for the oldest ice cores

Dutch plead in court for release of Greenpeace activists

WHALES AHOY
China exchange hatches plan for egg futures

Warsaw climate meet must measure rich lands' emissions

We'll rise or fall on the quality of our soil

EU faces decision on GM crop cultivation: Commission

WHALES AHOY
Improving earthquake early warning systems for California and Taiwan

Guatemala warns pilots of ash plume from volcano

Tropical Storm Sonia weakens after hitting Mexico

Hundreds evacuated as Indonesia volcano erupts

WHALES AHOY
African leaders discuss rapid-deployment emergency force

Hong Kong firm debuts in Africa with $104m S.African deal

Tanzania halts anti-poaching drive after abuse claims

China backs African bid to suspend ICC Kenya case

WHALES AHOY
Study: Humans made sophisticated stone tools earlier than thought

Did hard-wired fear of snakes drive evolution of human vision?

Hair regeneration method is first to induce new human hair growth

No known hominin is ancestor of Neanderthals and modern humans




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement