Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




CLIMATE SCIENCE
Geoengineering: A whiter sky
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Jun 05, 2012


There are several larger environmental implications to the group's findings, too. Because plants grow more efficiently under diffuse light conditions such as this, global photosynthetic activity could increase, pulling more of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere.

One idea for fighting global warming is to increase the amount of aerosols in the atmosphere, scattering incoming solar energy away from the Earth's surface. But scientists theorize that this solar geoengineering could have a side effect of whitening the sky during the day.

New research from Carnegie's Ben Kravitz and Ken Caldeira indicates that blocking 2% of the sun's light would make the sky three-to-five times brighter, as well as whiter. Their work is published in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

Carbon dioxide emissions from the burning of coal, oil, and gas have been increasing over the past decades, causing the Earth to get hotter and hotter. Large volcanic eruptions cool the planet by creating lots of small particles in the stratosphere, but the particles fall out within a couple of years, and the planet heats back up.

The idea behind solar geoengineering is to constantly replenish a layer of small particles in the stratosphere, mimicking this volcanic aftermath and scattering sunlight back to space.

Using advanced models, Kravitz and Caldeira-along with Douglas MacMartin from the California Institute of Technology-examined changes to sky color and brightness from using sulfate-based aerosols in this way. They found that, depending on the size of the particles, the sky would whiten during the day and sunsets would have afterglows.

Their models predict that the sky would still be blue, but it would be a lighter shade than what most people are used to looking at now. The research team's work shows that skies everywhere could look like those over urban areas in a world with this type of geoengineering taking place. In urban areas, the sky often looks hazy and white.

"These results give people one more thing to consider before deciding whether we really want to go down this road," Kravitz said. "Although our study did not address the potential psychological impact of these changes to the sky, they are important to consider as well."

There are several larger environmental implications to the group's findings, too. Because plants grow more efficiently under diffuse light conditions such as this, global photosynthetic activity could increase, pulling more of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere.

On the other hand, the effectiveness of solar power could be diminished, as less sunlight would reach solar-power generators.

"I hope that we never get to the point where people feel the need to spray aerosols in the sky to offset rampant global warming," Caldeira said. "This is one study where I am not eager to have our predictions proven right by a global stratospheric aerosol layer in the real world."

.


Related Links
Carnegie Institution
Climate Science News - Modeling, Mitigation Adaptation






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





CLIMATE SCIENCE
Is California preparing for climate change?
Stanford CA (SPX) Jun 04, 2012
A majority of California's coastal planners and resource managers now view the threats from climate change as sufficiently likely that practical steps on the ground need to be taken to protect against growing threats, according to results from a new survey published by Stanford University's Center for Ocean Solutions (COS) and the California Sea Grant. Survey respondents acknowledge the ne ... read more


CLIMATE SCIENCE
Japan agency sorry for comparing radiation to wife

Lithuania launches regional nuclear safety watchdog

Italy's quake-struck north tries to reassure tourists

Ferrari auction to raise money for Italy quake

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Artemis keeps talking the talk

Nintendo touts games for Wii U GamePad console

Microsoft links Xbox with smartphones, tablets

E3 to showcase big videogame titles, hot trends

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Monsoon arrives in India, cheering farmers

Lesotho dams bring investment, at a cost

Study finds ferry threat to Hong Kong dolphins

Great Barrier Reef heading for danger: UNESCO

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Peru needs glacier loss monitoring: dire UN warning

Greenland's current loss of ice mass

Old aerial photos supply new knowledge on glaciers in Greenland

Discovery Of Historical Photos Sheds Light On Greenland Ice Loss

CLIMATE SCIENCE
EU farming reform caught in budget stalemate

France to ban Swiss pesticide as bee threat

Brazil farmers in legal feud with Monsanto over GM soy

Livestock industry beefs up Illinois economy

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Hurricane season is here, and FSU scientists predict an active one

Unmanned NASA Storm Sentinels set for Hurricane Study

Toll of Italian earthquakes rises to 25

Japan city watches 'premonitory' signs for tsunami

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Conflicts hinder Niger, Mali locust control: UN food agency

Somali soldiers train for urban combat in rural Uganda

Sierra Leone's gruesome civil war

Mali deserters in Niger face uncertain future

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Monkey lip smacks provide new insights into the evolution of human speech

Stanford psychologists aim to help computers understand you better

New Mini-sensor Measures Magnetic Field of the Brain

University of Tennessee anthropologists find American heads are getting larger




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement