Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. Earth Science News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



CLIMATE SCIENCE
German judges agree to hear Peruvian's climate case against RWE
By Daphne Rousseau with Tom Barfield in Frankfurt
Berlin (AFP) Nov 30, 2017


A German court ruled Thursday that it would hear a Peruvian farmer's case against energy giant RWE over climate change damage in the Andes, a decision labelled by campaigners as a "historic breakthrough".

Farmer Saul Luciano Lliuya's case against RWE was "well founded," the court in the northwestern city of Hamm said in a statement.

Lliuya argues that RWE, as one of the world's top emitters of climate-altering carbon dioxide, must share in the cost of protecting his hometown Huaraz from a swollen glacier lake at risk of overflowing from melting snow and ice.

RWE's power plants emitted carbon dioxide that contributed to global warming, increasing local temperatures in the Andes and putting the father of two's property at risk from flooding or landslides, Lliuya argues.

"Even people who act according to the law must be held responsible for damage they cause to property," the judges said.

Now the court must decide whether "the accused's contribution to the chain of events depicted here is measurable and calculable," they added.

"This is a major success not just for me, but for the people of Huaraz and everywhere in the world threatened by climate risks," Lliuya said in a statement circulated by NGO Germanwatch.

He wants RWE to pay 17,000 euros ($20,000) towards flood defences for his community in Peru's northern Ancash region.

The 37-year-old also wants the German company to reimburse him for the 6,384 euros he himself has spent on protective measures.

Lliuya bases his claims on a 2013 climate study which found that RWE was responsible for around 0.5 percent of global emissions "since the beginning of industrialisation".

The court said in the statement that it would choose experts to evaluate the claim in cooperation with both plaintiff and defendant, with Lliuya paying some 20,000 euros in fees up front.

"It will be up to the experts to quantify (RWE's) role, which could be different" from the amount he claims, the judges said.

- 'Can't be accountable' -

After an initial hearing in mid-November, the Hamm court gave both sides until Thursday to provide further arguments to help them decide whether the case should go ahead.

The decision to hear the case is a "historic breakthrough with global relevance," Germanwatch, which has backed Lliuya's claim, said in a statement.

"Major emitters of greenhouse gases can be held responsible for protective measures against climate damage."

For RWE's part, "we still believe that one single emitter can't be held accountable for something that was contributed to from millions of sources and factors worldwide," the energy giant's spokesman Guido Steffen told AFP after the ruling.

"We realise that (Lliuya) is afraid for the safety of his land, but we think it's up to the authorities where he lives to defend it from acute dangers."

He added that RWE would appeal any ruling against it to Germany's highest court.

A lower court in the German city of Essen, where RWE is based, initially found that the lawsuit against the energy giant was unfounded.

The company has in the past said it did not understand why it has been singled out for legal action, stressing the efforts it had made to become more environmentally friendly.

As well as modernising its coal-fired power plants to reduce CO2 emissions, RWE has invested billions in renewable energy as part of Germany's move away from fossil fuels, it says.

Shares in RWE plunged on Germany's DAX index of blue-chip shares following the news, closing down 1.94 percent.

The Peruvian's case comes at a time when German politics is sharply divided over how to balance climate action against economic growth.

A government-directed "energy transition" to renewables, rather than nuclear power and fossil fuels, is making only halting progress, while environmentalists are pushing the country's powerful auto industry to produce less polluting vehicles after a series of scandals.

Climate and energy policy was among the most bitterly disputed issues in three-way coalition talks between Chancellor Angela Merkel's conservatives, the pro-business Free Democrats and the ecologist Greens before they broke down this month.

tgb/dlc/boc

RWE

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Europe backing climate ambitions with capital
Washington (UPI) Nov 29, 2017
The European Union is putting money behind its rhetoric on climate change through partnerships in Germany and in India, the commission said Wednesday. "The European Union sees global partnerships and increased cooperation as essential to advancing the union's strategic interests and to tackle global challenges," a statement from the European Commission read. The commission said i ... read more

Related Links
Climate Science News - Modeling, Mitigation Adaptation


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Beijing evicts migrants onto cold streets, sparking outcry

Russia opens commission into 'nuclear incident' report

Seven 'trapped' after cargo ships collide off south China

China port city blast caused by illegal explosives: police

CLIMATE SCIENCE
New way to write magnetic info could pave the way for hardware neural networks

Device could reduce the carbon footprint of ethylene production

Researchers inadvertently boost surface area of nickel nanoparticles for catalysis

X-rays reveal the biting truth about parrotfish teeth

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Why are there no sea snakes in the Atlantic?

The world needs to rethink the value of water

Scientists discover resilient 'heart' of Great Barrier Reef

Children who avoid tap water have lower lead levels but more tooth decay

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Antarctic Selfie's Journey to Space via Disruption Tolerant Networking

Antarctic landscape insights keep ice loss forecasts on the radar

Operation IceBridge 2017: The Beauty of Ice

Added Arctic data shows global warming didn't pause

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Istanbul anglers keep up tradition despite stocks alarm

Gene discovery may halt worldwide wheat epidemic

Genome of wheat ancestor sequenced

Fighting plant disease at warm temperatures keeps food on the table

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Indonesia reopening Bali airport shut by volcanic ash fears

New Zealand says no charges over killer quake building

Bali volcano burns wedding dreams, threatens economy

16 dead, 100 missing as cyclone hits India, Sri Lanka

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Mali justice minister resigns after activist's acquittal

Cash and history keep Europe as Africa's prime partner

China hails new Zimbabwe leader, denies role in transition

China taps Africa at Morocco Silk Road investment forum

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Long-term logging study demonstrates impacts on chimpanzees and gorillas

Chimp females who leave home postpone parenthood

What grosses out a chimpanzee?

Human evolution was uneven and punctuated, suggests new research




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement