Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




WOOD PILE
Heavily logged forests still valuable for tropical wildlife
by Staff Writers
Kent, UK (SPX) Sep 18, 2013


File image.

New research has found rainforests that have been logged several times continue to hold substantial value for biodiversity and could have a role in conservation. According to principal investigators, Dr Matthew Struebig and Anthony Turner from the University of Kent's Durrell Institute of Conservation Ecology (DICE), these findings challenge a long-held belief that there is limited, if any, value of heavily logged forests for conservation.

The research, which monitored bats as an indicator for environmental change on Borneo, is the first of its kind to have wildlife in forests logged more than two times. The findings are particularly important because across the tropics forest that has been intensively harvested is frequently targeted for conversion to agriculture and is perceived to hold little value for timber, carbon or biodiversity.

Dr Struebig, Lecturer in Biological Conservation from DICE, explains: 'Recent studies have emphasised similar numbers of species living in unlogged and logged sites, but what surprised us was just how resilient some species were, even in sites almost unrecognisable as rainforest.'

Only by viewing forest sites along a gradient of logging disturbance, ranging from pristine to heavily degraded, were the team able to detect a gradual decline of some key bat species.

The research confirmed the most vulnerable bats were those that tend to live in the cavities of old growth trees. By linking bat captures with vegetation measurements from nearby plots, the researchers were able to reveal how these animals declined as successive rounds of logging took their toll on forest structure, and crucially, the availability of tree cavities.

Although logging damage was clearly detrimental to some of the species studied, the findings also offer some hope for forest restoration efforts.

'Across the tropics there is increasing investment to restore the timber and wildlife in logged rainforests.' says Dr Struebig. 'For biodiversity, simple measures, such as setting artificial nest boxes for bats and birds may, if guided by research, help bring some species back to the numbers found in unlogged areas', he said.

The research, titled: 'Quantifying the Biodiversity Value of Repeatedly Logged Rainforests: Gradient and Comparative Approaches from Borneo' is published in Advances in Ecological Research, Volume 48, and includes the efforts of Malaysian, Indonesian and Canadian researchers in addition to scientists from the University of Kent and the University of East Anglia (UEA) in the UK.

This study is the first field data to be published from the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems Project in Sabah, Malaysia - a new landscape experiment which combines the efforts of more than 100 researchers around the world to investigate the impacts of logging, deforestation and forest fragmentation in the natural world. With support from the Sime Darby oil palm company and the Malaysian government, the aim is to produce a set of science-based recommendations for more sustainable practices in the logging and agriculture industries in tropical countries.

.


Related Links
Durrell Institute of Conservation Ecology (DICE)
Forestry News - Global and Local News, Science and Application






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WOOD PILE
Amazon deforestation due in part to soybean growing
Rio De Janeiro (AFP) Sept 17, 2013
Fighting deforestation of the Amazon for cattle raising and farming is one of the great rallying cries of the world's conservationists. And, while soybean growing's impact on the vast jungle has eased since a moratorium imposed in 2006, Brazil's huge soybean industry is still indirectly responsible for the felling of trees. The mechanism goes like this: soybean growers take over land tha ... read more


WOOD PILE
Obama urges new gun laws, swift Congress action unlikely

US military missed 'red flags' about gunman: Hagel

Flooded Acapulco hit by looting as tourists airlifted

New Technology can Detect Heartbeats in Rubble

WOOD PILE
Yahoo Japan develops 3D search engine-printer

GPS 3 And OCX Satellite Launch and Early Orbit Operations Successfully Demonstrated

'Terminator' polymer that regenerates itself

Northrop Grumman Delivers AEHF Flight 4 Antenna Precision Pointing Unit

WOOD PILE
Wetlands more cost-effective in nutrient removal, but multiple payments would be of uncertain value

Movement of marine life follows speed and direction of climate change

Water supply a problem for New Delhi's poor

Research shows denser seagrass beds hold more baby blue crabs

WOOD PILE
Warm Ocean Rapidly Melting Antarctic Ice Shelf from Below

Russia arrests Greenpeace Arctic activists, fires warning shots

Gas flaring and household stoves speed Arctic thaw

Russia to restore Soviet-era naval base in Arctic: Putin

WOOD PILE
The real reason to worry about bees

Study recommends strategies for improved management of fresh market spinach

Flame cultivation promising as weed control method for cranberry

New weapons on the way to battle wicked weeds

WOOD PILE
New storms loom as tourists seek Acapulco exit

Colorado floods death toll revised down

Airlift launched for tourists in flooded Acapulco

Death toll from Colorado floods rises to eight

WOOD PILE
160 UN peacekeepers desert Mali posts: military

Three Ivorian police killed in attacks

Uganda suspends 24 officers over Somalia corruption

Mali ministers met by hail of stones in Tuareg stronghold

WOOD PILE
Findings in Middle East suggest early human routes into Europe

Paleorivers across Sahara may have supported ancient human migration routes

Orangutans plan their future route and communicate it to others

New evidence that orangutans and gorillas can match images based on biological categories




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement