Earth Science News  





. Indonesia Prosecutors Challenge Newmont Verdict

Newmont, the world's largest gold miner, had always denied the charges, saying it disposed of toxins safely and levels of mercury and arsenic were within acceptable levels.
by Staff Writers
Jakarta (AFP) May 08, 2007
Indonesian prosecutors lodged an appeal Monday against last month's verdict that cleared US mining giant Newmont of dumping toxic waste into a pristine bay. "We have filed it to the Manado court," head prosecutor Purwanta told AFP. Purwanta said the appeal was filed to the court in Manado on Sulawesi island, and legal reasons for the challenge would be submitted to Indonesia's Supreme Court within two weeks.

"We will submit the document within 14 days after the appeal's registration," said Purwanta. Monday was the deadline for registering an appeal.

Prosecutors had vowed to challenge Newmont's acquittal over charges of pumping tonnes of waste including arsenic and mercury into Buyat Bay from its now defunct gold mine on Sulawesi island.

Prosecutors had wanted to jail company executive Richard Ness for three years in a high-profile case closely watched by international business leaders and environmental groups.

Ness and the company's Indonesian unit, PT Newmont Minahasa Raya, were also accused of damaging villagers' health and poisoning marine life.

Newmont, the world's largest gold miner, had always denied the charges, saying it disposed of toxins safely and levels of mercury and arsenic were within acceptable levels.

It had warned a guilty verdict would prompt it to reconsider investing in Indonesia, which is trying to lure foreign firms and overcome an international reputation for corruption and bureaucratic red tape.

Source: Agence France-Presse

Email This Article

Related Links
Newmont
Our Polluted World and Cleaning It Up

Tree Rings Show Elevated Tungsten Coincides With Nevada Leukemia Cluster
Fallon NV (SPX) May 01, 2007
Tungsten began increasing in trees in Fallon, Nev. several years before the town's rise in childhood leukemia cases, according to a new research report. The amount of tungsten in tree rings from Fallon quadrupled between 1990 and 2002, whereas the amount in tree rings from nearby towns remained the same, according to a research team led by Paul R. Sheppard of The University of Arizona's Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research.

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



  • US Control Strategies May Make Flu Epidemics Worse
  • In Search Of The Missing Dead
  • Exercise Tests Responses To Hurricane, Nuke And Terrorists
  • Poll Shows Support For FEMA

  • Question Marks Over Commitment By China Climate Change Mitigation
  • Despite Perils UN Report Upbeat On Climate Change
  • Sarkozy Urges Action On Global Warming
  • Scientists Retrieve Pristine Record of the Continent's Climate Cycles From Beneath Antarctica's Ross Sea

  • Volcanic Eruptions In Kamchatka
  • NASA Satellite Captures Image Of Georgia Wildfires
  • US Earth-Observing Satellites In Jeopardy
  • Exploring Caves From 30 Feet In The Air

  • Stepping Up Efforts To Push Through IPI Gas Project
  • Duke Energy Adds Energy Efficiency To Nuclear, Coal, Natural Gas And Renewables
  • New Layered-Layered Materials For Rechargeable Lithium Batteries
  • China Taps North Korea Resources

  • Experts Warn On Gambia AIDS Cure
  • HIV Treatment Goal Elusive
  • Bird Flu Genome Study Shows New Strains As new Infections Spread
  • Ebola Outbreaks Killing Thousands Of Gorillas And Chimpanzees

  • Climate Change Impacts Stream Life
  • Wildlife Caught In Web Of Internet Sales
  • Ecology In An Era Of Globalization
  • Scientists Offer New View Of Photosynthesis

  • Indonesia Prosecutors Challenge Newmont Verdict
  • Tree Rings Show Elevated Tungsten Coincides With Nevada Leukemia Cluster
  • Beijing Restrictions Offer Case Study In Emissions Of Key Atmospheric Gases
  • Indonesian Green Groups Slam Newmont Judges

  • Climate Changes Caused Neanderthal Extinction On The Iberian Peninsula
  • Sleep And Exercise Critical To A Smarter And Longer Life
  • Ape Gestures Offer Clues To The Evolution Of Human Communication
  • Americans See Climate Threat But Reluctant To Conserve

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2006 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA PortalReports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additionalcopyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement