Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Italy deploys drones, warships after refugee tragedies
by Staff Writers
Rome (AFP) Oct 14, 2013


India, US trying to hamper Pakistan quake relief: top militant
Islamabad (AFP) Oct 14, 2013 - The founder of a militant Islamist group blamed for the 2008 Mumbai attacks Monday accused the US and India of trying to hamper efforts to help victims of Pakistan's earthquake.

Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, who has a $10 million US government bounty on his head, said joint US-Indian efforts to block funds for his Jamat-ud-Dawa (JuD) organisation were aimed at stopping its relief work in Baluchistan, hit by a powerful quake last month.

JuD is seen as a front for Laskhar-e-Taiba (LeT), which Saeed founded and which investigators blame for the three-day carnage in Mumbai that killed 166 people.

The United States and India agreed on Sunday to step up cooperation to prevent the financing of extremist movements linked to Pakistan, including JuD and LeT.

But JuD denies terror accusations, and in Pakistan is known for its relief work after natural disasters, particularly the 2005 Kashmir earthquake and 2010 floods.

"Their aim is to hamper the relief work of our charity Falah-e-Insaniyat foundation in the earthquake hit Baluchistan, that's why they are trying to stop our funding," Saeed told reporters.

The 7.7-magnitude quake shook the southwestern province of Baluchistan on September 24, killing more than 370 people and leaving more than 100,000 homeless.

Both LeT and JuD are listed as terror organisations by the United Nations, but JuD operates freely in Pakistan and, despite the bounty on his head, Saeed lives openly.

Italy on Monday said it was deploying drones and warships in a large-scale high seas patrol mission to scare people smugglers amid a growing influx of asylum seekers crossing the Mediterranean.

"We have given the go-ahead to Operation Mare Nostrum (Our Sea)," Interior Minister Angelino Alfano said after a government meeting, following two refugee shipwreck disasters this month.

Defence Minister Mario Mauro said there would now be five warships on Italy's southern maritime border, including one equipped with an amphibious transport dock to take in refugees.

There are currently three navy vessels on patrol, along with six coast guard patrol boats and six border guard patrol boats, as well as helicopters and planes from each of the three agencies.

More helicopters and planes will now be sent to the vast area, equipped with night-vision and infrared technology to help spot refugee boats.

Mauro said the operation was intended to "help those in trouble at sea and make things difficult for the mother ships that put people's lives at risk by sending them out on rickety boats".

Larger boats sometimes make most of the journey and then send out smaller ones laden with asylum seekers once they are closer to Italian shores as part of a lucrative people-smuggling network.

"This will have a very significant deterrent effect for those who think they can traffic in human beings with impunity," the interior minister said.

The defence minister said that Italy would also use "remote piloting systems to increase the surveillance as much as possible" -- a reference to Predator drones, according to Italian media reports.

Italian officials fended off accusations from migration rights advocates that the operation reflected a "Fortress Europe" mentality.

The European Commission has urged European states to provide ships, planes and funds for the EU's Frontex border agency patrols after more than 360 people drowned off the Italian island of Lampedusa.

Italy's worst-ever refugee tragedy happened in the early hours of October 3 when a boat laden with Eritrean and Somali asylum-seekers caught fire, capsized and sank within sight of the coast.

Dozens of burials in anonymous vaults began on Monday in a small cemetery of Piano Gatta near the city of Agrigento in Sicily, even though Prime Minister Enrico Letta had promised to hold a state funeral for the victims.

There were heartbreaking scenes as the coffins were taken off Lampedusa by ship, with grieving relatives and members of the Eritrean diaspora throwing themselves on the caskets in despair.

"What we have experienced in these days is a painful chapter that calls for responsibility from Europe," Lampedusa mayor Giusi Nicolini said.

'Sea of death'

The Lampedusa disaster was followed just days later, last Friday, by another tragedy off Malta in which at least 36 Syrian refugees are now confirmed drowned after their boat flipped over.

"It is unacceptable that the Mediterranean become a sea of death," Letta, who wants the refugees to be a key issue on the agenda for a summit of EU leaders in Brussels next week, said on Monday.

The prime minister said the new patrol mission would be operational from Tuesday.

Letta is also planning to request that an Italian be appointed to head up Frontex and that the agency open an office in Italy, reports said.

Frontex is based in Poland and headed up by executive director Ilkka Laitinen from Finland.

Maltese Interior Minister Manuel Mallia meanwhile called for an "immediate solution" to the problem by boosting surveillance at points of departure -- chiefly the coast of an increasingly lawless Libya.

"Talking won't save lives," Mallia said in parliament, asking for "real solidarity" from other European states who could take in migrants who are stuck on Malta under current rules.

The UN refugee agency estimates 32,000 asylum seekers have landed in Italy and Malta this year -- many of them from Eritrea, Somalia and Syria.

The numbers have increased drastically since the Arab Spring revolts in North Africa in 2011, and there is a particularly serious problem in Libya, which is unable to control its maritime frontier.

"We have a non-state like Libya in front of us," Mauro said, adding: "What is going on in Syria will make millions of people flee for decades."

The arrivals continued unabated on Monday with four boatloads carrying more than 300 migrants landing on Italian shores, including one with 137 Syrian asylum seekers that landed on Lampedusa.

The Syrians have been taken to an overcrowded refugee centre where some of the 155 survivors from the October 3 disaster are also being housed.

.


Related Links
Bringing Order To A World Of Disasters
A world of storm and tempest
When the Earth Quakes






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





DISASTER MANAGEMENT
India, US trying to hamper Pakistan quake relief: top militant
Islamabad (AFP) Oct 14, 2013
The founder of a militant Islamist group blamed for the 2008 Mumbai attacks Monday accused the US and India of trying to hamper efforts to help victims of Pakistan's earthquake. Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, who has a $10 million US government bounty on his head, said joint US-Indian efforts to block funds for his Jamat-ud-Dawa (JuD) organisation were aimed at stopping its relief work in Baluchistan ... read more


DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Italy deploys drones, warships after refugee tragedies

Walker's World: Is France turning racist?

India, US trying to hamper Pakistan quake relief: top militant

Smart smoke alarm can speak, warn of smoke, carbon monoxide

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Circadian rhythms in skin stem cells protect us against UV rays

Northwestern Researchers Develop Compact, High-Power Terahertz Source at Room Temperature

Thousands march in Romania against Canadian mine plan

Ultraviolet light to the extreme

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Residents willing to pay for water improvements

Fishermen, farmers secure livelihoods ahead of Indian cyclone

More than 500 million people might face increasing water scarcity

University teams with industry to build deep-sea submersible

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Greenpeace boss admits surprise at harsh Russian response

Russia keeps Greenpeace ship captain behind bars

Brazil to start work on new Antarctic base next year

US shutdown puts freeze on Antarctic research

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Conflict and clashes over China's prized caterpillar fungus

McGill discovery should save wheat farmers millions of dollars

WCS reduces fish bycatch with escape gaps in Africa

Rural land use policies curb wildfire risks - to a point

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Mass evacuations in Vietnam for typhoon Nari

India cyclone survivors return home to destruction

First test of Venice's 5.4 billion euro flood barriers

Strong quake strikes remote Pacific islands

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Mali ex-coup leader moves out of army barracks

Islamists step up attacks in north Mali

Ethiopia says no plans to withdraw troops from Somalia

'Armed bandits' kill Niger soldier, wound three others in Nigeria: official

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Study suggests women, not men, created much of ancient cave art

Living descendants of 5,300-year-old 'Iceman' identified

Primate brains follow predictable development pattern

Longer life for humans linked to further loss of endangered species




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement