Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Earth Science News .




WHALES AHOY
Japan dolphin-killing town to open marine park
by Staff Writers
Tokyo (AFP) Oct 07, 2013


The Japanese town made infamous by the Oscar-winning documentary "The Cove" will open a marine park where visitors can swim with dolphins, but officials said Monday its annual slaughter of the creatures will continue in a nearby bay.

And unrepentant organisers say they want tourists to be able to eat dolphin and whale meat as they watch the captive animals frolic.

The town of Taiji has begun researching a plan to section off part of a cove and turn it into a place where people can swim in the water and kayak alongside small whales and dolphins, Masaki Wada told AFP.

But, the local government official insisted, far from having caved in to pressure from conservationists who want an end to a yearly hunt that turns waters red with blood, the project was aimed at helping to sustain the practice.

"We already use dolphins and small whales as a source of tourism in the cove where dolphin-hunting takes place," he said.

"In summer swimmers can enjoy watching the mammals that are released from a partitioned-off space.

"But we plan to do it on a larger scale. This is part of Taiji's long-term plan of making the whole town a park, where you can enjoy watching marine mammals while tasting various marine products, including whale and dolphin meat," he said.

The park will be separate from Hatakejiri Bay, the place into which the fishermen of Taiji corral dolphins, select a few dozen for sale to aquariums and marine parks, and stab the rest to death for meat.

The plan calls for the creation of a whale safari park stretching roughly 28 hectares (69 acres) by putting up a net at the entrance to Moriura Bay in northwestern Taiji, the official said.

The 2009 film "The Cove" brought Taiji to worldwide attention, winning an Oscar the following year, after graphically showing the killing of dozens of trapped animals, including by using underwater cameras. Activists continue to visit the town to protest the hunt.

Taiji, in western Wakayama prefecture, is looking to open part of the park within five years, Wada said.

Black whales and bottlenose dolphins caught in waters near the town would be released into the area, which would be developed as a nature park that also includes beaches and mudflats, he said.

Wakayama prefecture said the town caught 1,277 dolphins in 2012 and has licence to capture 2,026 this season, which began in September and runs until August next year.

Tokyo-based conservationist group Iruka & Kujira (Dolphin & Whale) Action Network (IKAN) said the plan was "unfortunate" for the town.

"The whole plan is based on the concept that they can exploit dolphins and whales freely as their resource, but the mammals don't belong to Taiji," said Nanami Kurasawa, the IKAN secretary general.

"Marine mammals migrate across oceans, and international public opinion is that wildlife should be allowed to live as they are. The plan will only ignite more protests over dolphin-hunting," she said.

People in Taiji argue that dolphin-hunting is part of a 400-year-old whaling and culinary tradition. They charge that campaigns against it are cultural imperialism that neglects the parallels between killing dolphins and killing cattle.

But Kurasawa said demand for dolphin meat is dwindling and only 100 people of the 3,400 population are engaged in dolphin hunting-related businesses.

"If they want to get more tourists, they can for example exhibit the beautiful whale-hunting ships used in ancient days, that would show their tradition without stirring more controversy," she said.

Japan regularly draws international ire for its annual whale hunt in the Antarctic, with Australia bringing the issue to the International Court of Justice this year.

Tokyo defends the practice as internationally legal "scientific research", a byproduct of which is the meat that ends up on dinner tables back home. However, critics say the research is a pretext for a hunt that is underwritten by taxpayers' money.

.


Related Links
Follow the Whaling Debate






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WHALES AHOY
Genetics helps identify hunted, and poorly known, whale species
New York (UPI) Oct 3, 2013
A genetic study of a species of whales sometimes targeted by Japan's scientific whaling program could aid management strategies for the animals, scientists say. The study has helped define populations and subspecies of Bryde's whale, a medium-sized and poorly understood baleen whale, the Wildlife Conservation Society reported Thursday. The research has confirmed the existence of ... read more


WHALES AHOY
Indonesia to boost patrols against people smugglers

'Ship in a bottle' detects dangerous vapors

Satellite flood maps reach crisis teams via Internet

US banks $584 mln in Egypt aid for safe-keeping

WHALES AHOY
Making household items on 3D printer said greener than factory versions

A thermoelectric materials emulator

Lockheed Martin and Concord Blue to Deploy Advanced Gasification Technology Globally

Lockheed Martin Powers on First GOES-R Weather Satellite

WHALES AHOY
Scientists warn of 'deadly trio' risk to ailing oceans

Dams provide resilience to Columbia from climate change impacts

South Atlantic fish resources at risk from warmer climate

Pacific's Palau mulls drone patrols to monitor waters

WHALES AHOY
Arctic shipping route may take 20 years, Maersk CEO: FT

Russia to charge Greenpeace activists with piracy: report

Largest ice mass in California's Yosemite park melting, disappearing

Europe's top court rejects Inuit appeal against seal fur ban

WHALES AHOY
Russia again cites tainted meat imports from Poland

Toxic metal selenium and diesel fumes baffle bees

Understanding soil nitrogen management using synchrotron technology

Protecting the weedy and wild kin of globally important crops

WHALES AHOY
11 dead as rains lash central, southern Philippines

U.S. seismologist calls for national warning system for earthquakes

Typhoon Fitow slams into China, kills five

Floods add misery after Philippine Muslim rebel siege

WHALES AHOY
Islamists step up attacks in north Mali

Ethiopia says no plans to withdraw troops from Somalia

'Armed bandits' kill Niger soldier, wound three others in Nigeria: official

Nigeria bombs Boko Haram 'camp' near site of massacre

WHALES AHOY
Council of Europe attacks genetic procedure

Ancient sagas show Vikings more social, less warlike

Einstein's genius put down to 'well-connected' brain halves

Roma families face wholesale expulsion from France




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement