Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Earth Science News .




DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Landslide fatalities are greater than previously thought
by Staff Writers
Durham, UK (SPX) Aug 20, 2012


File image courtesy AFP.

Landslides kill ten times more people across the world than was previously thought, according to research by Durham University, UK. A new database of hazards shows that 32,300 people died in landslides between 2004 and 2010. Previous estimates ranged from 3,000 to 7,000 fatalities.

The database, which provides the first detailed analysis of fatal landslides across the world, maps hotspots including China, Central and South America, and India.

The researchers say that the new database, the Durham Fatal Landslide Database (DFLD), can help policymakers to prioritise areas for action to manage hazards and to lessen the risks to human populations living in hotspot regions.

The findings are published in the journal Geology.

Lead researcher, Professor David Petley, a Geographer at the International Landslide Centre, and Co-Director of The Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience, Durham University, said: "The environmental effects of landslides are often devastating for nearby human populations.

"We need to recognise the extent of the problem and take steps to manage what is a major environmental risk to people across the world. Our database will enable us to do this by identifying areas most at risk and could help to save thousands of lives."

The DFLD includes only fatal landslides and is compiled using a number of search tools and analysis of government statistics, aid agency reports, and research papers.

It is still likely that the database underestimates the number of landslides and deaths. The database excludes data from landslides caused by earthquakes due to the high level of uncertainty associated with these events. Following an earthquake, where there is a fatal landslide, the deaths are attributed to the earthquake trigger itself, rather than the landslide.

The researchers say that weather patterns, deforestation, melting permafrost in high mountainous areas, and high and increasing human population densities are important factors in the cause, distribution, number, extent and effects of landslides.

More fatal landslide events are recorded in May to October and the dominant global trigger is rain from the monsoon. Tropical cyclones also generate extreme rainfall events that trigger landslides in Asia, and hurricanes have the same effect on regions in the Caribbean and Central America.

In some areas with a history of fatal landslides, such as Hong Kong, programmes to mitigate the risks of landslides have been successful.

Professor David Petley said: "Areas with a combination of high relief, intense rainfall, and a high population density are most likely to experience high numbers of fatal landslides. Landslides are a global hazard requiring a major change in perception and policy.

"There are things that we can do to manage and mitigate landslide risks such as controlling land use, proactive forest management, and guiding development away from vulnerable areas."

Global landslide hotspots:
+ Southern edge of the Himalayan Arc

+ South west coast of India

+ Sri Lanka

+ Southern and eastern coasts of China

+ Central China, notably the mountains around the Sichuan Basin

+ Western edge of the Philippine Sea plate (Japan, Taiwan and the Philippines)

+ Central Caribbean islands including Haiti

+ Indonesia, especially in Java

+ Along the mountainous chain from Mexico, Central America, to Chile, South America, but especially in Colombia

.


Related Links
Durham University
Bringing Order To A World Of Disasters
A world of storm and tempest
When the Earth Quakes






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Assamese flee Bangalore over safety fears
Bangalore, India (UPI) Aug 17, 2012
India's prime minister has called for calm as thousands of people northeastern India but now living in the southern city of Bangalore fear for their safety. No deaths or violent incidents have been reported but rumors of threats against people from India's remote northeastern states, including Assam, have sent thousands flooding into Bangalore's main train station to buy tickets out of ... read more


DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Landslide fatalities are greater than previously thought

Assamese flee Bangalore over safety fears

Studies examine health consequences of meltdown, damage to Fukushima nuclear power plants in Japan

Two African boat migrants dead, 160 rescued off Malta

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Good vibrations

Britain and Ireland tuning into Netflix

Apple is most valuable company ever at $623 bn

Micro-thruster could move small satellites

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Ohioans Love Their Lakes, But Are Concerned For Their Future

Invasive brittle star species hits Atlantic Ocean

Removing Phosphorous From Wastewater

Rating of ocean health shows 'room for improvement'

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
First Chinese ship makes trip to Atlantic via Arctic route

Predictions are in for Arctic sea ice low point

Melting ice opens Northwest Passage

Tropical climate in the Antarctic

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Scores of mastic orchards ravaged by Greek wildfire

China sees red over Europe wine imports

Aquaculture Feeding World's Insatiable Appetite for Seafood

Impulsive micromanagers help plants to adapt, survive

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Typhoon kills 17 in Vietnam

Typhoon Kai-Tak kills nine in Vietnam

New storm brings flashfloods, landslides to Philippines

6.3-magnitude quake hits Indonesia's Sulawesi

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Kenyan, Ugandan troops battle al-Shabaab

S.Africa police say mine killings were self-defence; 34 dead

Defence ministers meet on DR Congo

South Africa's lion bones: Asia's new delicacy

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Research raises doubts about whether modern humans and Neanderthals interbred

Old skull bone rediscovered

A new take on how evolution has shaped modern Europeans

Neolithic Man: The First Lumberjack?




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement