. Earth Science News .

Live longer with fewer calories
by Staff Writers
Gothenburg, Sweden (SPX) Nov 15, 2011

File image.

By consuming fewer calories, ageing can be slowed down and the development of age-related diseases such as cancer and type 2 diabetes can be delayed. The earlier calorie intake is reduced, the greater the effect. Researchers at the University of Gothenburg have now identified one of the enzymes that hold the key to the ageing process.

"We are able to show that caloric restriction slows down ageing by preventing an enzyme, peroxiredoxin, from being inactivated. This enzyme is also extremely important in counteracting damage to our genetic material," says Mikael Molin of the Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.

By gradually reducing the intake of sugar and proteins, without reducing vitamins and minerals, researchers have previously shown that monkeys can live several years longer than expected.

The method has also been tested on everything from fishes and rats to fungi, flies and yeasts with favourable results.

Caloric restriction also has favourable effects on our health and delays the development of age-related diseases. Despite this, researchers in the field have found it difficult to explain exactly how caloric restriction produces these favourable effects.

Using yeast cells as a model, the research team at the University of Gothenburg has successfully identified one of the enzymes required.

They are able to show that active peroxiredoxin 1, Prx1, an enzyme that breaks down harmful hydrogen peroxide in the cells, is required for caloric restriction to work effectively.

The results, which have been published in the scientific journal Molecular Cell, show that Prx1 is damaged during ageing and loses its activity.

Caloric restriction counteracts this by increasing the production of another enzyme, Srx1, which repairs Prx1. Interestingly, the study also shows that ageing can be delayed without caloric restriction by only increasing the quantity of Srx1 in the cell.

Repair of the peroxiredoxin Prx1 consequently emerges as a key process in ageing.

"Impaired Prx1 function leads to various types of genetic defects and cancer. Conversely, we can now speculate whether increased repair of Prx1 during ageing can counteract, or at least delay, the development of cancer."

Peroxiredoxins have also been shown to be capable of preventing proteins from being damaged and aggregating, a process that has been linked to several age-related disorders affecting the nervous system, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. The researchers are accordingly also considering whether stimulation of Prx1 can reduce and delay such disease processes.

The articles 'Life Span Extension and H2O2 Resistance Elicited by Caloric Restriction Require the Peroxiredoxin Tsa1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae' has been published in the journal Molecular Cell. and Expert comments in the same issue Translating a Low-Sugar Diet into a Longer Life by Maintaining Thioredoxin Peroxidase Activity of a Peroxiredoxin

Related Links
University of Gothenburg
All About Human Beings and How We Got To Be Here

Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
Buy Advertising Editorial Enquiries


. Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Asian couples rush to wed on auspicious date
Shanghai (AFP) Nov 11, 2011
Thousands of couples across Asia swamped marriage registries and held mass weddings on Friday, believing that the quirk of the calendar makes 11/11/11 the most auspicious date in a century. In China, the world's most populous country, registries were packed with couples wanting to wed on the date that has been recognised as an unofficial "singles' day" since the 1990s because it is made up e ... read more

UN atomic agency praises Fukushima clean-up

China mourns victims of deadly Shanghai fire

North China gas blast kills nine

North China gas blast kills eight: state media

Radioactive iodine: Now France detects traces in atmosphere

Kindle Fire shipping to mixed reviews

Android doubles smartphone market share: Gartner

Kindle Fire shipping to mixed reviews

Climate change threatens Nile, Limpopo rivers: study

One if by Land, Two if by Sea? Climate Change "Escape Routes"

In Romania, hydro frenzy spells green dilemma

Group calls on tuna fisheries for better shark protection

Prof Helping To Unravel Causes Of Ice Age Extinctions

International Team to Drill Beneath Massive Antarctic Ice Shelf

Preparing for a thaw: How Arctic microbes respond to a warming world

Chinese tycoon one step closer to Icelandic land purchase

Researchers gain insight into 100-year-old Haber-Bosch process

Some land in Japan too radioactive to farm: study

WWF sounds warning on caviar

EU tightens control of Chinese rice over GM fears

Bangkok floods could go into next year: Thai PM

Flood-weary residents lash out in Bangkok

Erupting volcano DR Congo's hottest new tourist attraction

40 dead in latest Turkey quake: authorities

Nobel laureate Gbowee to lead Liberian peace initiative

Sudan beefing up border air strike capacity: monitors

US condemns bombing by Sudan Armed Forces

S.Sudan accuses Khartoum of deadly air strike on camp

Live longer with fewer calories

Asian couples rush to wed on auspicious date

The selective advantage of being on the edge of a migration wave

Erasing the signs of aging in cells is now a reality


The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2011 - Space Media Network. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement