Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Earth Science News .




WEATHER REPORT
Lockheed Martin Marks Defense Meteorological Satellite Program 50th Anniversary
by Staff Writers
Sunnyvale, CA (SPX) Sep 24, 2012


The DMSP constellation comprises two spacecraft in near-polar orbits, C3 (command, control and communications), user terminals and weather centers. The latest launch occurred on October 18, 2009 when DMSP F-18 roared into orbit aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket.

Fifty years ago, a small weather satellite was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB), Calif. It was the first in a series that would later become known as the U.S. Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP), spanning 41 successful launches over a half-century, with two satellites still remaining to be sent into space. All were launched from VAFB into near-polar orbits allowing them to image the entire Earth, one slice at a time, as it rotated below.

"We congratulate the U.S. Air Force on this historic anniversary of a remarkable program that year after year has provided critical environmental data that enhanced our national security both strategically and tactically," said Mark Valerio, vice president and general manager of Military Space at Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] Space Systems Company (LMSSC).

"As we reflect on Lockheed Martin's 100 year anniversary, we are enormously proud of our 50-year partnership with the U.S. Air Force in advancing our nation's defense weather mission. Since the very beginning of the program in 1962, Lockheed Martin has built every DMSP spacecraft, and this has been, and remains, a true source of pride for us."

Initially, the DMSP program was highly classified and run by the National Reconnaissance Program (NRP), in support of the CORONA program, and its first reconnaissance satellites.

The CORONA satellites took pictures on 70 mm film, and while each satellite carried up to 32,000 feet of film, it eventually would run out and the mission would end when the last film-return capsule re-entered the Earth's atmosphere over the Pacific.

Thus, it was essential to the success of the CORONA mission that timely and accurate DMSP forecasts be made over areas of interest so that cloud-free photography would be possible, taking maximum advantage of film limitations.

At 50 years, DMSP is the longest running production satellite program ever. During that time, DMSP satellites have saved many billions of dollars and countless human lives as a result of timely weather forecasts.

While the NOAA TIROS program launched the first weather satellite in 1960, over the years the TIROS program became a recipient of DMSP technology in excess of $1 billion.

DMSP is still providing strategic and tactical weather prediction to aid the U.S. military in planning operations at sea, on land and in the air. Equipped with a sophisticated sensor suite that can image visible and infrared cloud cover and measure precipitation, surface temperature, and soil moisture, the satellites collect specialized global meteorological, oceanographic, and solar-geophysical information in all weather conditions.

The DMSP constellation comprises two spacecraft in near-polar orbits, C3 (command, control and communications), user terminals and weather centers. The latest launch occurred on October 18, 2009 when DMSP F-18 roared into orbit aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket.

The current Block 5D-3 series accommodates larger sensor payloads than earlier generations. They also feature a larger capability power subsystem; a more powerful on-board computer with increased memory - allowing greater spacecraft autonomy - and increased battery capacity that extends the mean mission duration.

Starting with F-17, the attitude control subsystem has also been enhanced with the integration of a second inertial measurement unit using ring laser, versus mechanical, gyros to provide greater precision pointing flexibility.

Two satellites remain to be launched, as needed, and are maintained at the Lockheed Martin Space Systems facility in Sunnyvale, Calif., for storage, functional testing, and upgrading. The spacecraft are shipped to Vandenberg for launch when requested by the Air Force. The Space and Missile Systems Center at Los Angeles Air Force Base, Calif. manages the DMSP program.

LMSSC, a major operating unit of Lockheed Martin Corporation, designs and develops, tests, manufactures and operates a full spectrum of advanced-technology systems for national security and military, civil government and commercial customers.

Chief products include human space flight systems; a full range of remote sensing, navigation, meteorological and communications satellites and instruments; space observatories and interplanetary spacecraft; laser radar; ballistic missiles; missile defense systems; and nanotechnology research and development.

.


Related Links
DMSP at LA AFB
Weather News at TerraDaily.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WEATHER REPORT
World's hottest temperature cools a bit
Tempe, AZ (SPX) Sep 19, 2012
If you think this summer was hot, it's nothing compared to the summer of 1913, when the hottest temperature ever recorded was a searing 134 F in Death Valley, Calif. But while that reading was made 99 years ago, it is only being recognized now by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) as the most extreme temperature ever recorded. That's because an international team of meteorologists ... read more


WEATHER REPORT
EU offers Italy 670 mn euros in quake aid

Norway supplies $168M for famine relief

Haunting 'Land of Hope' part shot on location in Fukushima

Japan slams brakes on $63 billion in spending

WEATHER REPORT
'5,000 police' quell Foxconn brawl: state media

Apple seeks more damages in wake of win against Samsung

ORNL research uncovers path to defect-free thin films

Humans were already recycling 13,000 years ago

WEATHER REPORT
Zimbabwe city orders 'big flush' amid water rationing

In half century, Brazil lost 80% of coral reef: study

The "slippery slope to slime": Overgrown algae causing coral reef declines

Sea Surface Temperatures Reach Record Highs on Northeast Continental Shelf

WEATHER REPORT
'Planetary emergency' due to Arctic melt, experts warn

Warming ocean could start big shift of Antarctic ice

Arctic Sea Ice Hits Smallest Extent In Satellite Era

Alpine glaciers contribute to carbon cycling

WEATHER REPORT
Global economic pressures trickle down to local landscape change, altering disease risk

Pesticides not yet proven guilty of causing honeybee declines

Growing corn to treat rare disease

Horticultural hijacking

WEATHER REPORT
Million displaced by floods in India: officials

An Expedition to the Earth's Fiery Heart

Hurricane Miriam in the Pacific strengthens to Category 2

Discovering Hot Towers

WEATHER REPORT
24-hour curfew imposed in restive Nigeria state

Endless Congo war flares anew amid mutiny

Food supplements have little effect on the weight of malnourished children

Moroccan ex-POWs from W. Sahara conflict hold sit-in

WEATHER REPORT
Breaking up harder to do on Facebook

Genetic mutation may have allowed early humans to migrate throughout Africa

Ancient tooth may provide evidence of early human dentistry

People change moral position without even realizing it




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement