Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Earth Science News .




DISASTER MANAGEMENT
MH370 searchers detect promising acoustic lead
by Staff Writers
Perth, Australia (AFP) April 07, 2014


Malaysia Airlines has 'work to do' fixing image: CEO
Kuala Lumpur (AFP) April 07, 2014 - Malaysia Airlines, which was already haemorrhaging cash in the face of intense competition, has "got a lot of work to do" recovering from the disappearance of MH370, its CEO said Monday.

The flag-carrier airline has reported hefty losses for three years running, and MH370 now raises the spectre of a potential drop in bookings over safety concerns and possible huge payouts to passengers' families.

"First and foremost, obviously this incident has affected the airline," CEO Ahmad Jauhari Yahya said during a regular MH370 press briefing in Kuala Lumpur.

"We've got a lot of work to do. The airline obviously needs to get itself together."

The plane disappeared en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing on March 8 with 227 passengers and 12 crew on board.

Followed intently around the world, the crisis has been a public relations disaster for the airline, which had previously boasted a solid safety record.

Relatives of the 153 Chinese passengers on board have criticised the airline and Malaysian government as "liars" and "murderers", alleging the truth was being concealed.

Airlines can take "up to six months to recover from what we call a 'market reputation issue' and ... we intend to do that quicker," Ahmad Jauhari said.

In an interview with the Wall Street Journal published Sunday, he said ticket sales had suffered after MH370, calling it "natural."

But the newspaper said he did not provide specifics on sales, nor comment on how the airline's financial results would be affected.

On Monday, when he asked whether he would resign as a result of MH370, Ahmad Jauhari said: "As far as my own personal position, I have work to do here."

Analysts have long blamed poor management, government interference, a bloated workforce, and powerful, change-resistant unions for preventing the airline from remaining competitive.

They say the only thing keeping the airline afloat was financial support from Malaysia's state investment arm, which owns 70 percent of the carrier.

The company announced a 1.17 billion ringgit ($360 million) loss for 2013, higher than expected by analysts. It lost 2.5 billion ringgit and 433 million ringgit, respectively, in 2011 and 2012.

A US-based law firm has said it planned to initiate "multi-million-dollar" lawsuits against Malaysia Airlines and Boeing, manufacturer of the aircraft.

An Australian navy ship has detected new underwater signals consistent with aircraft black boxes, the search chief said Monday, describing it as the "most promising lead" so far in the month-old hunt for missing Flight MH370.

Retired Australian defence force chief Angus Houston said the acoustics, emanating from deep down in the Indian Ocean, showed that the multinational search by ships and planes seemed to be "very close to where we need to be".

The apparent breakthrough comes as the clock ticks past the 30-day lifespan of the emergency beacon battery fitted to the black box of the Malaysia Airlines jet, which vanished on March 8 with 239 people on board en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing.

"The towed pinger locator deployed from the Australian defence vessel Ocean Shield has detected signals consistent with those emitted from aircraft black boxes," Houston told a press conference.

"We have not found the aircraft yet, we need further confirmation," he said, while describing the information received over the past 24 hours as "very encouraging".

One of the contacts continued for two hours and 20 minutes with the second lasting for 13 minutes. "On this (second) occasion two distinct ping returns were audible," Houston said.

"Significantly, this would be consistent with transmission from both the flight data recorder and the cockpit voice recorder.

"This is a most promising lead and probably in the search so far it's probably the best information that we have had," the former air chief marshal said.

"We are now in a very well-defined search area which hopefully will eventually lead to the information that we need to say that MH370 might have entered the water just here."

The hunt was adjusted to the southern end of the search zone Sunday after corrected satellite data showed it was more likely the plane entered the water there. The location is thousands of kilometres south of the flight's scheduled route to Beijing.

Malaysian inquiries into the aircraft's disappearance have centred on hijacking, sabotage or psychological problems among passengers or crew, but there is no evidence yet to support any of the theories.

In the absence of confirmed wreckage, the black box or other firm evidence, relatives of those aboard -- who were mostly Chinese -- have endured an agonising wait for information.

- 'Nothing happens fast' -

Houston called on the public to treat the latest information cautiously, given the sensitivities of the families of those presumed lost.

"It could take some days before information is available to establish whether these detections can be confirmed as being from MH370," he added.

"In very deep oceanic water, nothing happens fast."

The Ocean Shield is using a "Towed Pinger Locator" lent by the US Navy. The Australian vessel and Britain's HMS Echo had been scouring separate ends of a 240-kilometre track, converging on each other, when it detected the acoustic noise.

Both ships and their towed-pinger equipment operate at significantly reduced speed to plumb depths of three thousand metres or more.

Houston's Joint Agency Coordination Centre (JACC) said that in total up to nine military planes, three civilian planes and 14 ships were scanning the search zone around 2,000 kilometres (1,250 miles) northwest of Perth.

The latest acoustics were picked up after the Chinese vessel Haixun 01 detected two signals about 300 nautical miles away which officials said were on a frequency used for aircraft flight data and cockpit voice recorders.

Australian authorities have said the Haixun 01 had twice picked up a signal -- once for 90 seconds on Saturday and another more fleeting "ping" on Friday a short distance away.

Houston said Haixun 01 was in waters about 4.5 kilometres (nearly three miles) deep, meaning "any recovery operation is going to be incredibly challenging and very demanding and will take a long period of time" if the plane is found there.

He noted that when Air France Flight 447 plunged into the Atlantic in 2009, it took two years to find the black box on the ocean floor -- long after wreckage was found in the crash's immediate aftermath.

"Essentially this (MH370) has been done without finding any wreckage thus far and I think it's quite extraordinary, and what I would like to see now is us find some wreckage."

.


Related Links
Bringing Order To A World Of Disasters
A world of storm and tempest
When the Earth Quakes






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





DISASTER MANAGEMENT
US urges ASEAN armies to prepare for more natural disasters
Honolulu (AFP) April 03, 2014
US officials on Wednesday offered to help ASEAN countries prepare for the devastating effects of climate change, urging stronger cooperation among armies and emergency agencies. Pentagon chief Chuck Hagel and other top officials discussed the danger posed by rising global temperatures with ASEAN defense ministers in Honolulu, home to a major US weather research center that tracks sea levels ... read more


DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Chileans scramble for supplies after new quake

Chileans scramble for supplies after new quake

Malaysia PM 'will not rest' until MH370 answers found

US urges ASEAN armies to prepare for more natural disasters

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Materials and electronics that dissolve when triggered

Chemists develop gold coating that dims glare

Math modeling integral to synthetic biology research

World's oldest weather report could revise Bronze Age chronology

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Oxygen depletion in the Baltic Sea is 10 times worse than a century ago

Warming Climate May Spread Drying to a Third of Earth

Ecuador hydroelectric blast kills four Chinese workers

Invasive waterways species spread due to climate change

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Good pay, no crime: life is good in Chilean Antarctica

River ice reveals new twist on Arctic melt

'Great opportunities' from climate change: Iceland PM

NSIDC, NASA Say Arctic Melt Season Lengthening, Ocean Rapidly Warming

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
US diners gorge on oysters as polluted bay revives

Scientists ID Genes that Could Lead to Tough, Disease-Resistant Varieties of Rice

Urban gardeners may be unaware of how best to manage contaminants in soil

Damaging effects of biochar on plant defence casts doubt on geoengineering claims

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Death toll rises to 16 in Solomons floods, 49,000 homeless

Ecuador's 'throat of fire' belches giant ash column

NASA Model Provides a 3-D Look at L.A.-area Quake

Minor tsunami hits Japan after Chile quake

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
French forces move east in new phase of C. Africa operation

Nigerian military hits back at Boko Haram abuse claims

Cameroon arrests three for trafficking arms to Boko Haram

Underfunded S.Africa military in 'critical decline': review

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Indigenous societies' 'first contact' typically brings collapse, but rebounds are possible

Technofossils are an unprecedented legacy left behind by humans

Scientists build 'designer' chromosome

New Technique Sheds Light on Human Neural Networks




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.