Earth Science News  





. Minimising The Spread Of Deadly Hendra Virus

As a result of these findings, veterinarians and horse owners are likely to consider the possibility of Hendra virus infection sooner when dealing with sick horses. This will mean appropriate management strategies can be put in place immediately, reducing the risk of spread while testing is being carried out.
by Staff Writers
Canberra, Australia (SPX) Apr 07, 2009
Groundbreaking CSIRO research into how the deadly Hendra virus spreads promises to save the lives of both horses and humans in the future.

CSIRO Livestock Industries' scientists working at the Australian Animal Health Laboratory (AAHL), in Geelong Victoria, have made a major breakthrough in better understanding how Hendra spreads from infected horses to other horses and humans.

Funded by the Australian Biosecurity CRC for Emerging Infectious Diseases, Dr Deb Middleton and her team at AAHL have defined the period following the first signs of disease when horses are most likely to shed Hendra virus and therefore infect other horses and people.

First identified in Brisbane in 1994, Hendra virus, which spreads from flying foxes, has regularly infected horses in Australia. Of the 11 equine outbreaks, four have led to human infection, with three of the six known human cases being fatal, the most recent of these in August 2008.

Dr Middleton says limited information in the past, on when the disease can transmit, has made it difficult to manage infected horses to stop Hendra spreading further to people and other susceptible horses.

"Our research has also determined the best biological samples required for rapid diagnosis of the virus in horses and identified the important relationship between the period of highest transmission risk and the time with which the disease can easily be detected," Dr Middleton says.

As a result of these findings, veterinarians and horse owners are likely to consider the possibility of Hendra virus infection sooner when dealing with sick horses. This will mean appropriate management strategies can be put in place immediately, reducing the risk of spread while testing is being carried out.

"Unlike in horse flu, where apparently healthy horses can transmit the virus, horses in the early stages of Hendra infection generally appear to be at lower risk compared to animals with more advanced signs of illness."

These research findings will be used to update the guidelines that horse owners and vets use to handle potential Hendra virus infections.

Dr Middleton says her research also indicates there is an opportunity to diagnose Hendra virus in horses early, prior to advanced clinical signs and the highest risk of transmission.

"Developing a sensitive and specific stall-side test, which vets could use out in the field to diagnose the disease, has become even more important. However there are still key challenges to developing this type of advanced technology."

Although it is still not known how Hendra spreads from flying foxes to horses, Dr Middleton says the key to preventing human exposure and the exposure of additional horses is first understanding the disease in horses and secondly controlling the viral spread from diseased horses.

Share This Article With Planet Earth
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit
YahooMyWebYahooMyWeb GoogleGoogle FacebookFacebook



Related Links
CSIRO Livestock Industries
Australian Animal Health Laboratory
Epidemics on Earth - Bird Flu, HIV/AIDS, Ebola




Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
Ecologists Question Effects Of Climate Change On Infectious Diseases
Washongton DC (SPX) Apr 04, 2009
Recent research has predicted that climate change may expand the scope of human infectious diseases. A new review, however, argues that climate change may have a negligible effect on pathogens or even reduce their ranges. The paper has sparked debate in the ecological community.

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



  • Fast Communication Channels Critical For Public Health
  • WHO urges countries to build disaster-proof hospitals
  • New math formula might predict tsunamis
  • China quake activist detained: rights group

  • Establishing A Unified Climate Change Language
  • New Greenhouse Gas Identified
  • Australian state eases drought restrictions
  • Relocation, Relocation, Relocation

  • Angry British villagers stop Google maps car: report
  • Satellite Snow Maps Help Reindeer Herders Adapt To A Changing Arctic
  • NASA Continues To Advance International Polar Year Science
  • Satellites Will Help Predict Disasters

  • Analysis: Energy Dept. stimulus grants
  • Analysis: Oil and Gas Pipeline Watch
  • Germany's Linde unveils new Chinese joint venture
  • Russia-China pipeline ready in 'a few weeks': Putin

  • Minimising The Spread Of Deadly Hendra Virus
  • Ecologists Question Effects Of Climate Change On Infectious Diseases
  • China says no cover-up in disease outbreak
  • China calls for vigilance in disease outbreak: state media

  • Bird Can Read Human Gaze
  • Redefining DNA: Darwin From The Atom Up
  • Permian Extinction Not A Global Event
  • Researchers Discover Primer To Plant Defense System

  • 'Super Sherpa' climbs to clean up Everest
  • Wanted: Mayor for polluted, accident-prone China city
  • Berlusconi opens Naples incinerator
  • Industry No Threat To Australian Burrup Rock Art

  • British woman does 314-foot ocean dive
  • Teeth Of Columbus' Crew Flesh Out Tale Of New World Discovery
  • Americans spend eight hours a day in front of screens
  • Optimum Running Speed Is Stride Toward Understanding Human Body Form

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2007 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement