Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Earth Science News .




FROTH AND BUBBLE
Nations agree to phase out toxic chemical HBCD
by Staff Writers
Geneva (AFP) May 10, 2013


Governments have agreed to phase out the use of the toxic chemical HBCD, and restrict trade in four other dangerous substances, the head of the UN's anti-pollution division said Friday.

"Adding these chemicals to the list is a good thing, because they are known to be quite bad chemicals," Jim Willis, executive secretary of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions, told reporters as a two-week international conference wrapped up in Geneva.

The conference agreed to ban the production and use of HBCD from next year, albeit with a five-year grace period for its use as a flame-retardant in polystyrene building insulation.

HBCD, or hexabromocyclododecane, is also used in interior textile fittings for vehicles as well as packaging materials. It is considered a "persistent organic pollutant" -- chemicals which linger in the environment, enter the food chain and thereby pose risks to human health and nature.

Health campaigners say that among its ills is that it undermines the ability of children to learn and grow because it can harm thyroid function and brain development.

Such chemicals are overseen by the Stockholm Convention, finalised in the Swedish capital in 2001 and which to date has drawn in 179 nations.

A separate accord, the 1998 Rotterdam Convention, restricts trade in chemicals by obliging exporters to ensure that destination countries have been fully informed about the risks involved and have given an explicit green light for imports.

A total of 152 nations have signed up to that accord, and the parties agreed to add four chemicals to its list: the insecticide azinphos-methyl; perfluorooctanesulfonates, which can be used as water repellents; and two forms of flame-retardant, pentabromodiphenyl ether and octabromodiphenyl ether.

Delegates failed, however, to slap similar trade restrictions on the pesticide paraquat, in the face of resistance piloted by India.

In addition, they were unable to reach a consensus on adding chrysotile asbestos -- which health experts say causes cancer -- to the list.

Past efforts to do so were long stymied by Canada, a major producer until the government withdrew support to the industry last year.

With Ottawa taking a back seat, the baton was picked up by Zimbabwe and Russia, the globe's top asbestos producer.

Unlike the 180-nation Basel Convention of 1989, which governs exports of toxic waste notably from rich to poor countries, the Stockholm and Rotterdam Conventions lack compliance mechanisms and have to rely on countries honouring their pledges.

.


Related Links
Our Polluted World and Cleaning It Up






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





FROTH AND BUBBLE
Toxic waste sites cause healthy years of life lost
New York NY (SPX) May 08, 2013
Toxic waste sites with elevated levels of lead and chromium cause a high number of "healthy years of life lost" in individuals living near 373 sites located in India, Philippines and Indonesia, according to a study by a Mount Sinai researcher published online in Environmental Health Perspectives. The study leader, Kevin Chatham-Stephens, MD, Pediatric Environmental Health Fellow at the Ica ... read more


FROTH AND BUBBLE
Finding a sensible balance for natural hazard mitigation with mathematical models

Even Clinton couldn't get Led Zep to Sandy show

Brother admits defeat in tragic Bangladesh search

New York's Sandy lesson: evacuate and get boats

FROTH AND BUBBLE
One order of steel; hold the greenhouse gases

Cloud computing is silver lining for Russian firms

Another 'trophy' for the chemistry cabinet

Researcher Construct Invisibility Cloak for Thermal Flow

FROTH AND BUBBLE
New Robotic Instruments to Provide Real-Time Data on Gulf of Maine Red Tide

EU begins difficult talks on fishery reforms

Lockheed Martin Announces New System Available for Underwater Inspection

Ireland's Coveney vows to help break EU fisheries reform deadlock

FROTH AND BUBBLE
Climate Record From Bottom of Russian Lake Shows Arctic Was Warmer Millions of Years Ago

Ice-free Arctic may be in our future

The effect of climate change on iceberg production by Greenland glaciers

Ice wall crashes into Canada cottages

FROTH AND BUBBLE
KFC China sales crash 36% in April on bird flu fears

Slippery eel slides towards disaster

US Supreme Court finds for Monsanto in seed patent battle

KFC China sales crash 36% in April on bird flu fears

FROTH AND BUBBLE
Risk of another Indian Ocean earthquake, tsunami said underestimated

China marks anniversary of killer Sichuan quake

Myanmar moves internal refugees as cyclone nears

Bangladesh issues cyclone alert

FROTH AND BUBBLE
S.Sudan soldiers accused of looting spree

Tanzanian troops head for UN mission to fight Congo rebels

Jihadists hunted in Tunisia 'former Mali fighters'

Nigeria's Islamists boost military threat

FROTH AND BUBBLE
One big European family

Earliest Archaeological Evidence of Human Ancestors Hunting and Scavenging

Humans may have driven ancient mastodons into 'civil war'

Monkey math




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement