Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




WOOD PILE
Native Plant Fares Well in Pilot Green Roof Research Study
by M.B. Reilly for UC News
Cincinnati OH (SPX) Oct 16, 2012


UC's Ishi Buffam and Jill Bader conduct green roof research.

As the implementation of green roofs increase, a University of Cincinnati pilot study examined which plants best thrive on the region's roofs during the dry, hot conditions of summer. That research, by UC biology student Jill Bader and Ishi Buffam, assistant professor of biology, identified a North American (and Ohio) native plant - nodding wild onion (Allium cernuum) and a European sedum (Sedum acre, also known as goldmoss sedum) as suited to survive and thrive on the region's green roofs.

Their research will be presented in a paper titled "Ohio Native Plants On a Green Roof: Evaluation of Survival and Impact on Stormwater Runoff" at the CitiesAlive 2012 conference, sponsored by Green Roofs for Healthy Cities in Chicago.

"Our research will help inform the design of green roofs specific for this region, and therefore increase their chances of being successful, and being adopted in Midwestern cities. There are many potential benefits to green roofs, including building energy savings, extension of roof life, reduced air and noise pollution, creation of environment for native birds and insects and, of course, reduced storm water runoff," said Buffam.

Bader and Buffam tested four Ohio native plants and one sedum to see which was the most likely to survive on an extensive green roof in the late summer of 2011. All plants were tested under two conditions: dependent on rainfall only and receiving regular watering. The testing took place at the Cincinnati Center for Field Studies in Harrison, Ohio.

All plants receiving regular watering survived.

However, heath aster (Aster ericoides), flowering spurge (Euphorbia corollata) and lanced-leaved loosestrife (Lysimachia lanceolata) did not survive when receiving rainfall as their only water source.

When receiving only rainfall, the nodding wild onion (A. cernuum) and the goldmoss sedum (S. acre) were stressed but survived.

All of these plants were selected for testing because their natural habitat is prairie or meadow, where exposure to full sun and dry conditions are typical.

According to Bader, "We tested the plants because one of the most critical choices for the success of a green roof is the choice of plant species. The environment on a rooftop is characterized by severe drought, elevated temperatures, high light intensity, high winds and the layer of soil for the plants is generally shallower than it would be for plants in typical settings."

In fact, a contributing factor in the success of S. acre and A. cernuum to survive was shallow root systems, paired with characteristics that allow them to efficiently use water during hot, dry conditions.

In the case of A. cernuum, it's a bulb which can store water for later use by the plant, and in the case of S. acre, it's the relatively thick foliage and CAM photosynthesis. (CAM photosynthesis is an adaptation by plants living in arid conditions that allows stoma or tiny pores in the foliage to close during the day in order to retain moisture but opening at night in order to complete part of the photosynthesis process.)

Bader and Buffam added that environmental conditions vary widely by geographic regions in North America. There are hundreds of eco-regions in North America, and that demands study of which plants work best in each region.

In addition to testing which Ohio native plants could best survive on an extensive green roof, Bader and Buffam also tested the impact of plant species to reduce water runoff, one of the important functions of a green roof. (In other words, which of the tested plants best retained water, such that the water was absorbed vs. running into the sewer system.)

In this preliminary test, the native species receiving moisture only from rainfall (vs. regular watering) retained 51 percent of rainfall on average, but there was no significant difference among the species in their abilities to absorb water and reduce total runoff quantity. Those plants receiving regular watering retained 44 percent of rainfall on average.

This pilot study was supported by UC's Julia Hammler Wendell Scholarship Fund, Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) Program and Cincinnati Center for Field Studies at Miami Whitewater Forest, a research station partnership between the University of Cincinnati and the Hamilton County Park District.

.


Related Links
University of Cincinnati
Forestry News - Global and Local News, Science and Application






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WOOD PILE
Dire drought ahead, may lead to massive tree death
Knoxville TN (SPX) Oct 16, 2012
Evidence uncovered by a University of Tennessee, Knoxville, geography professor suggests recent droughts could be the new normal. This is especially bad news for our nation's forests. For most, to find evidence that recent years' droughts have been record-breaking, they need not look past the withering garden or lawn. For Henri Grissino-Mayer he looks at the rings of trees over the past on ... read more


WOOD PILE
French broadcaster apologises to Japan over Fukushima gag

Planning can cut costs of disasters: World Bank

12 Chinese workers killed, 24 hurt in dormitory blaze

Far, far beyond wrist radios

WOOD PILE
ESA deploys first orbital debris test radar in Spain

Boeing Proposes Gas Clouds to Remove Space Debris

Microsoft to price new tablet near same as iPad

UNH scientists provide window on space radiation hazards

WOOD PILE
Scientists Uncover Diversion of Gulf Stream Path in Late 2011

Documented decrease in frequency of Hawaii's northeast trade winds

Too much of a good thing can be bad for corals

Judge scraps Amazon dam hearing

WOOD PILE
NASA's Operation IceBridge Resumes Flights Over Antarctica

Antarctic Sea Ice Reaches New Maximum Extent

Polarstern returns with new findings from the Central Arctic during the 2012 ice minimum

DRI scientist co-authors study outlining vast differences in polar ocean microbial communities

WOOD PILE
Mystery of nematode pest-resistant soybeans cracked

Gene Suppression Can Reduce Cold-induced Sweetening in Potatoes

Nepal culls chickens amid bird flu outbreak

Strengthening a billion-dollar gene in soybeans

WOOD PILE
Tropical cyclones are occurring more frequently than before

Hurricane Paul loses punch as it nears Mexico

Paul becomes major hurricane off Mexico

Scientists identify trigger for explosive volcanic eruptions

WOOD PILE
Critical bishop expelled from Chad back in Italy

Four dead after day of violence in restive Nigerian city

Thousands march in Mali to urge intervention against Islamists

Nigerian farmers sue Shell in Dutch case with global reach

WOOD PILE
Nasty noises: Why do we recoil at unpleasant sounds

UN report warns of possible rise in child marriages

Chimps said attacking humans in Africa

New human neurons from adult cells right there in the brain




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement