Earth Science News  





. New Orleans Still At Risk Of Serious Flooding

Many people have already rebuilt their flood-ravaged houses, often right onto the slabs that the rushing waters left behind. Most refused to wait for official word on whether their street was safe and have been encouraged to return home by city officials who vowed to rebuild all neighborhoods. Photo courtesy AFP.
by Staff Writers
New Orleans (AFP) June 21, 2007
New Orleans is still at risk of serious flooding two years after Hurricane Katrina ravaged the city, a government report has found. While the levees and floodwalls that collapsed under Katrina's storm surge have been repaired, authorities have not yet raised the height of levees that were overtopped by the floodwaters.

That means that the risk of flooding in many neighborhoods remains virtually unchanged, said a report prepared by the US Army Corps of Engineers, the federal agency that oversees the country's flood control projects.

The report stops short of deeming any of the city's neighborhoods, many of which lie well below sea level, uninhabitable. Instead, it leaves the decision of whether to resettle some heavily damaged areas up to individuals and local officials.

"People are going to understand their risk, their personal risk," Lt. Gen. Robert Van Antwerp, newly installed chief of the corps, told the New Orleans Times-Picayune.

"You have a right to know what we know. And the other important part of that is truth well told. How do we translate this so everyone understands?"

Many people have already rebuilt their flood-ravaged houses, often right onto the slabs that the rushing waters left behind. Most refused to wait for official word on whether their street was safe and have been encouraged to return home by city officials who vowed to rebuild all neighborhoods.

Mayor Ray Nagin, who has vowed to rebuild all parts of New Orleans, said in a statement Thursday that the report is of limited use.

"Even if this information is accurate, simply identifying the risk does not solve the problem," he said. "We need to know what the Corps is doing to resolve the problem, because people are returning home and are rebuilding. These American citizens deserve the protection they were denied to begin with."

Katrina killed more than 1,500 people and flooded about 80 percent of New Orleans, forcing hundreds of thousands of residents from their homes.

Repairs to the 563-kilometer (350-mile) system of levees, floodgates, pumps and seawalls that protect the region are expected to be complete by 2011.

But many here have called for a stronger system that could protect the city from a Category 5 hurricane, an expensive and technologically challenging task that has yet to gain support from the Bush Administration or federal lawmakers.

Source: Agence France-Presse

Email This Article

Related Links
US Army Corps of Engineers
Bringing Order To A World Of Disasters
A world of storm and tempest
When the Earth Quakes




Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
Water Spray Latest Headache For Indonesian Mudflow Engineers
Jakarta (AFP) June 20, 2007
Indonesian experts scrambled Wednesday to deal with a massive water spray gushing from the ground near a "mud volcano" of toxic sludge on Indonesia's Java island. Ahmad Zulkarnain, the spokesman for the government team handling the disaster, said that the five-metre (16-feet) high spray began before dawn on Saturday through the floor of a restaurant in Jatirejo village, near the mudflow area.

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



  • New Orleans Still At Risk Of Serious Flooding
  • Water Spray Latest Headache For Indonesian Mudflow Engineers
  • Building House Forms And Shapes For Better Hurricane Endurance
  • NOAA Satellites Ready For Active Hurricane Season

  • Dutch Data Shows China Surpassed The US In 2006 Carbon-Dioxide Emissions
  • Climate Models Consistent With Ocean Warming Observations
  • World Desertification Day Puts Spotlight On Neglected Crisis
  • UN Secretary General Points To Climate Change As Partly Behind Darfur Disaster

  • QuikSCAT Marks Eight Years On-Orbit Watching Planet Earth
  • Ukraine To Launch Earth Observation Satellite In 2008
  • NASA Satellites Watch as China Constructs Giant Dam
  • Boeing Launches Italian Earth Observation Satellite

  • China Hits Back On Climate Change After Being Tagged Top Culprit
  • OPEC Wants Reasonable Price For Its Oil
  • Renewable Sources Contributed Nearly 10 Percent To US Electric Generation In 2006
  • US Official Emphasizes Enforcement Role in Energy Markets

  • Ancient Retrovirus Sheds Light On Modern Pandemic
  • Bird Flu Fears Reignited
  • Bono And Geldof blast G8 AIDS Pledge Farce
  • US Firm To Trial Bird Flu Vaccine In Indonesia And Hong Kong

  • Explorers To Use Robotic Vehicles To Hunt for Life And Vents On Arctic Seafloor
  • Ancient DNA Traces The Woolly Mammoth Disappearance
  • Book Makes Case For Using Evolution In Everyday Life
  • Study Shows Lizard Moms Dress Their Children For Success

  • Indonesian Activists Report Snoozing Newmont Judges
  • EPA Wants Tighter US Smog Controls
  • Human Noses To Sniff Out Pollutants Across China
  • Polluted Chinese River Hospitalises 61

  • UN Warns Aging Populations Will Require New Approaches
  • Etruscans Were Immigrants From Anatolia In Ancient Turkey
  • The High Cost Of The Beijing Olympics
  • New Findings Challenge Established Views About Human Genome

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2006 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA PortalReports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additionalcopyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement