Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Earth Science News .




FROTH AND BUBBLE
New data show agricultural anabolic steroids regenerate in aquatic ecosystems
by Staff Writers
Reno NV (SPX) Oct 02, 2013


Ed Kolodziej is an associate professor and researcher in the University of Nevada, Reno's College of Science and project leader of a collaborative multi-disciplinary research team that includes the University of Iowa and Truman State. He and his team found a new mechanism where chemicals transform, under certain conditions, to avoid detection, which may account for unexplained observations of endocrine disruption in aquatic organisms. Credit: Photo courtesy of University of Nevada, Reno.

New regulatory approaches may be needed to assess environmental risks of agricultural growth promoters, and similar human pharmaceuticals, following research that shows a newly found reversion mechanism allows unexpected persistence of the steroidal substances in aquatic environments.

Results of the research will be published in an article in the renowned journal Science - the weekly journal of AAAS, the science society - next month and are available immediately online in Science Express.

"We investigated trenbolone, an anabolic steroid, and found that the photochemical breakdown isn't the end of its life cycle," Ed Kolodziej, co-author of the paper and environmental engineering professor at the University of Nevada, Reno, said. "Our team found that these substances, after a rapid breakdown in sunlight, are capable of a unique transformation in aquatic environments under various temperature and light-cycle scenarios where the process is reversed."

Kolodziej, project leader of a collaborative multi-disciplinary research team that includes the University of Iowa and Truman State, said this newly found mechanism may account for unexplained observations of endocrine disruption in aquatic organisms.

"Right now, I'm not alarmed, just concerned and interested in defining the real ecological risks associated with the widespread use of potent steroidal pharmaceuticals," Kolodziej, who has been studying the effects of these substances on aquatic ecosystems for 12 years, said.

"This implies uncertainty with the current environmental risk assessments or ecotoxicology studies used by regulatory agencies, researchers and pharmaceutical companies."

The team used laboratory and field studies to explore the process. They found that the steroid's chemical compounds, while breaking down as expected in sunlight, never fully disappeared; even in conditions that mimicked surface water, a small percentage of the chemical structure remained after extended sunlight. The remains regenerated themselves at night, in some cases to up to 70 percent of the metabolites initial mass."

"We knew something unique was going on," David Cwiertny, Kolodziej's research partner from the University of Iowa, said. "In daylight, it essentially hides in another form, to evade analysis and detection, and then at nighttime it readily transforms back to a state that we can detect."

The researchers validated the lab results with two experiments in the field - one with water taken from the Iowa River in Iowa City, Iowa and the other from samples taken from a collection pond at a cattle rangeland and research operation in California's Central Valley run by the University of California, Davis.

Trenbolone is a federally approved drug widely used by the beef industry to promote weight gain and to increase feeding efficiency in cattle. The drug, although popular in the bodybuilding and weightlifting communities, and as an athletic performance enhancer, has long been banned for human use, and also is banned for agricultural uses in the E.U.

Trenbolone has been considered safe for ecosystems due to its initially rapid degradation, with studies pointing to an environmental half-life of less than a day. Studies have indicated that low concentrations of these endocrine disrupting environmental steroids affect fish, by reducing egg production of females and skewing the sex of some species.

.


Related Links
University of Nevada, Reno
Our Polluted World and Cleaning It Up






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





FROTH AND BUBBLE
Pollution deadlier than road accidents in Sao Paulo
Sao Paulo (AFP) Sept 24, 2013
Air pollution kills more people annually than road accidents in Sao Paulo, Brazil's most populous city which will host the opening game of the 2014 World Cup, a study found. The survey by the Health and Environment out Tuesday said at least 4,655 people died from pollution-related ailments in the city which is home to 11 million, compared with 1,556 killed in crashes. With four million v ... read more


FROTH AND BUBBLE
Satellite flood maps reach crisis teams via Internet

US banks $584 mln in Egypt aid for safe-keeping

China launches satellite to monitor natural disaster

Australia and Indonesia hold conciliatory discussions

FROTH AND BUBBLE
Bright, laser-based lighting devices

S. Korean steel plant in India could displace 22,000, says UN

New sensor could prolong the lifespan of high-temperature engines

Paradigm shift: Need something in space? Print it, don't ship it

FROTH AND BUBBLE
Scientists warn of 'deadly trio' risk to ailing oceans

Dams provide resilience to Columbia from climate change impacts

South Atlantic fish resources at risk from warmer climate

Pacific's Palau mulls drone patrols to monitor waters

FROTH AND BUBBLE
Largest ice mass in California's Yosemite park melting, disappearing

Europe's top court rejects Inuit appeal against seal fur ban

Traces of immense prehistoric ice sheets: the climate history of the Arctic Ocean needs to be rewritten

Warming hits Greenland's caribou

FROTH AND BUBBLE
Understanding soil nitrogen management using synchrotron technology

Protecting the weedy and wild kin of globally important crops

Hotpots and snake blood: Asia's libido-boosting foods

Farmers need help to plow through new food safety regulations

FROTH AND BUBBLE
Pakistan quake death toll rises to 376

Disaster officials warn New Orleans, Gulf coast over storm Karen

Five dead as Typhoon Wutip batters Vietnam

Tropical Storm Jerry forms in Atlantic

FROTH AND BUBBLE
Nigeria bombs Boko Haram 'camp' near site of massacre

Canada reinforces African Union forces in Somalia

Disgruntled Malian troops fire weapons, kidnap officer

Ugandan officers court-martialed over alleged coup plot

FROTH AND BUBBLE
Einstein's genius put down to 'well-connected' brain halves

Roma families face wholesale expulsion from France

Genetic study pushes back timeline for first significant human population expansion

Your brain digitally remastered for clarity of thought




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement