Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




OZONE NEWS
New study reveals gas that triggers ozone destruction
by Staff Writers
York UK (SPX) Jan 16, 2013


Using laboratory models, they show that the reaction of ozone with iodide on the sea surface could account for around 75 per cent of observed iodine oxide levels over the tropical Atlantic Ocean.

Scientists at the Universities of York and Leeds have made a significant discovery about the cause of the destruction of ozone over oceans. They have established that the majority of ozone-depleting iodine oxide observed over the remote ocean comes from a previously unknown marine source.

The research team found that the principal source of iodine oxide can be explained by emissions of hypoiodous acid (HOI) - a gas not yet considered as being released from the ocean - along with a contribution from molecular iodine (I2).

Since the 1970s when methyl iodide (CH3I) was discovered as ubiquitous in the ocean, the presence of iodine in the atmosphere has been understood to arise mainly from emissions of organic compounds from phytoplankton -- microscopic marine plants.

This new research, which is published in Nature Geoscience, builds on an earlier study which showed that reactive iodine, along with bromine, in the atmosphere is responsible for the destruction of vast amounts of ozone - around 50 per cent more than predicted by the world's most advanced climate models - in the lower atmosphere over the tropical Atlantic Ocean.

The scientists quantified gaseous emissions of inorganic iodine following the reaction of iodide with ozone in a series of laboratory experiments. They showed that the reaction of iodide with ozone leads to the formation of both molecular iodine and hypoiodous acid.

Using laboratory models, they show that the reaction of ozone with iodide on the sea surface could account for around 75 per cent of observed iodine oxide levels over the tropical Atlantic Ocean.

Professor Lucy Carpenter, of the Department of Chemistry at York, said: "Our laboratory and modelling studies show that these gases are produced from the reaction of atmospheric ozone with iodide on the sea surface interfacial layer, at a rate which is highly significant for the chemistry of the marine atmosphere.

"Our research reveals an important negative feedback for ozone - a sort of self-destruct mechanism. The more ozone there is, the more gaseous halogens are created which destroy it. The research also has implications for the way that radionucleides of iodine in seawater, released into the ocean mainly from nuclear reprocessing facilities, can be re-emitted into the atmosphere."

Professor John Plane, from the University of Leeds' School of Chemistry, said: "This mechanism of iodine release into the atmosphere appears to be particularly important over tropical oceans, where measurements show that there is more iodide in seawater available to react with ozone.

The rate of the process also appears to be faster in warmer water. The negative feedback for ozone should therefore be particularly important for removing ozone in the outflows of pollution from major cities in the coastal tropics."

.


Related Links
University of York
All about the Ozone Layer






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





OZONE NEWS
From Discovery, To Solution, To Evolution: Observing Earth's Ozone Layer
Greenbelt MD (SPX) Oct 26, 2012
Remember the ozone hole? A signature environmental concern of the 1980s has become a signature environmental success story. While a strong international treaty regulates ozone-depleting substances, scientists at NASA and NOAA continue to keep a close eye on the evolving state of ozone in the atmosphere. Yes, an ozone hole above Antarctica still forms each year - just six years ago in 2006 ... read more


OZONE NEWS
Canada to resettle up to 5,000 Iranian, Iraqi refugees

China factory fire hidden by thick smog: media

Allianz sticks to profit goal despite Hurricane Sandy hit

Hannover Re hit by 261-million-euro loss from Sandy

OZONE NEWS
ECAPS signs contract with Skybox for complete propulsion system

Boeing Grows Composite Manufacturing Capability in Utah

Molecular machine could hold key to more efficient manufacturing

Study reveals ordinary glass's extraordinary properties

OZONE NEWS
MBL scientists find 'bipolar' marine bacteria, refuting 'everything is everywhere' idea

Wales, fishermen discuss protection zones

Living cells behave like fluid-filled sponges

Taiwan mulls shipping water from China as ties improve

OZONE NEWS
Will changes in climate wipe out mammals in Arctic and sub-Arctic areas?

Global warming opening up Russia's Arctic

Antarctic lake reached after millennia

A new approach to assessing future sea level rise from ice sheets

OZONE NEWS
How does your garden glow?

EU hints at insecticide ban over threat to bees

Using lysine estimates to detect heat damage in DDGS

Study shows pine beetle outbreak buffers watersheds from nitrate pollution

OZONE NEWS
Four children die in Mozambique floods

Mozambique floods kill 2, destroy homes

Volcano lava flows worry Italian island

Faulty Behavior

OZONE NEWS
Hollande, in Gulf, defends France's Mali offensive

French marines in Mali wait for orders to join the fight

Mali Islamists flee bases, battered by French airstrikes

U.S. frets it'll get dragged into Mali war

OZONE NEWS
Eliminating useless information important to learning, making new memories

Tech world crawling into the crib

Promising compound restores memory loss and reverses symptoms of Alzheimer's

Dopamine-receptor gene variant linked to human longevity




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement