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. Ocean Microbe Census Discovers Diverse World of Rare Bacteria

A collection of marine microbes. The darkest ones are a very common filamentous form that at present have not been formerly identified in scientific literature. The large pink ovoid is a cell of Chromatium a purple sulphur bacterium, the green is a cyanobacterium. The curving structure at about 2 o'clock is a diatom (Nitzschia), which is a photosynthetic eukaryote. Photo credit: D. J. Patterson, L. Amaral-Zettler and V. Edgcomb. Courtesy of micro*scope.
by Staff Writers
Woods Hole MA (SPX) Aug 02, 2006
A startling revelation about the number of different kinds of bacteria in the deep-sea raises fundamental new questions about microbial life and evolution in the oceans.

In a paper published in the USA by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Journal (July 31, online early edition), scientists reveal marine microbial diversity may be some 10 to 100 times more than expected, and the vast majority are previously unknown, low-abundance organisms theorized to play an important role in the marine environment as part of a "rare biosphere."

"These observations blow away all previous estimates of bacterial diversity in the ocean," says lead author Mitchell L. Sogin, director of the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL)'s Josephine Bay Paul Center for Comparative and Molecular Biology and Evolution, located in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

"Microbiologists have formally described 5,000 microbial 'species'," he says. "This study shows we have barely scratched the surface. Over the last 10 to 20 years, molecular studies have shown there to be more than 500,000 kinds of micro organisms. In our new study, we discovered more than 20,000 in a single liter (about one quart) of seawater, having expected just 1,000 to 3,000."

Related Links
Josephine Bay Paul Center for Comparative and Molecular Biology and Evolution

Evidence Of Rapid Evolution Is Found At The Tips Of Chromosomes
New York NY (SPX) Aug 02, 2006
In terms of their telomeres, mice are more complicated than humans. That's the finding from a recent Rockefeller University study, which shows that mice have two proteins working together to do the job of a single protein in human cells.

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