Earth Science News  





.
TRADE WARS
Panama: Injuries, arrests in mining law protests

Gnobe indigenous peoples protest on February 27, 2011 in San Felix, Panama. The Gnobes were protesting the construction of power plants and open-air mines in Chiriqui. Image courtesy AFP.
by Staff Writers
Panama City (AFP) Feb 26, 2011
Panamanian Indians and police clashed for a third consecutive day Saturday over a new mining law, with local media reporting dozens of injuries and arrests.

Violence erupted when police tried to remove barricades on different stretches of the Pan-American highway, which links Panama City with Costa Rica.

Local media reported dozens injured, including police officers, and an unknown number of arrests in several spots in the provinces of Veraguas and Chiriqui.

The protesters had blocked the highway for two days to underscore their demand for President Ricardo Martinelli to overturn a controversial new mining law, aimed at attracting foreign investment for exploration of minerals.

The conservative Martinelli administration on Tuesday issued a decree banning mining in Indian territory, but it hasn't stopped the protests.

Martinelli and his supporters in the National Assembly argue that mining could be Panama's second largest source of income after fees from the trans-oceanic canal.

Students, environmentalists and indigenous groups, however, fear mining code changes would spoil the pristine jungle and force Indian communities to relocate.

earlier related report
Panama Indians block roads protesting mining law
Panama City (AFP) Feb 25, 2011 - Hundreds of Panamanian Indians blocked stretches of the Pan-American highway Friday for a second consecutive day, hoping to get President Ricardo Martinelli to overturn a controversial new mining law.

Protesters burned tires and used tree trunks to halt traffic in at least four spots on the highway, which links Panama City with Costa Rica, an AFP journalist reported.

Many of the protesters carried machetes and bows and arrows, and some donned face paint or wore ski masks.

"We are expecting the president to overturn this law that affects us so much as soon as possible," Felix Rodriguez, the head of the Ngobe-Bugle Indians, told AFP.

Martinelli "has to pay attention to us," said Rodriguez, who was at a road block in the eastern Chiriqui province. Police were absent from the area.

Scores of cars and trucks had been stranded on the highway, which among other things is used by trucks moving goods that arrive by ship to Panama destined to other Central American nations.

There was no reports of violence or arrests. Similar protests were held Thursday.

Marches and demonstrations have been going on for weeks even though the conservative Martinelli administration on Tuesday issued a decree banning mining in Indian territory.

Lawmakers in Panama on February 10 approved legislation to attract foreign investment to its mining industry, despite opposition from students and indigenous groups.

Martinelli and his supporters in the National Assembly argue that mining could be Panama's second largest source of income after fees from the trans-oceanic canal.

Students, environmentalists and indigenous groups, however, fear changes to the mining code -- untouched since the 1960s -- would spoil the pristine jungle and force Indian communities to relocate.

Polls have shown that most Panamanians believe an increase in mining would hurt the environment and Indian communities.








Share This Article With Planet Earth
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit
YahooMyWebYahooMyWeb GoogleGoogle FacebookFacebook



Related Links
Global Trade News



Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
TRADE WARS
China shifting to no-logo luxury says Chloe CEO
Shanghai (AFP) Feb 25, 2011
The tastes of China's wealthy are shifting away from designer goods with flashy logos to more understated luxury brands, the chief executive of French fashion house Chloe said Friday. That shift has helped Chloe become one of the Swiss luxury goods company Richemont Group's fastest-growing labels in China, its CEO said. "China has been very fast at picking up the most well-known brands," ... read more

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  


TRADE WARS
Google backs weather insurance startup

Year after Chile quake, president pledges vigilance

Can-do army lifts Christchurch from quake

Language school became NZealand quake disaster zone

TRADE WARS
Dell plans China expansion: state media

Xoom sales 'off to good start': Motorola CEO

Videogame makers seek footing on shifting landscape

Japan's NEC in LCD tie-up with China's Tianma

TRADE WARS
Survey Finds More Sea Islands Disappear In China

Marine 'Networks' Can Protect Fish Stocks

Scientists warn of water woes

Research helps Hawaii produce exports

TRADE WARS
Old Salt Suggests Marine Life Is Capturing More Carbon

Carbon Sink At South Pole Has Grown Recently

Massive iceberg shears off glacier after quake hit

Climate change halves Peru glacier: official

TRADE WARS
Seed collection in Norway vault grows

Applications for modified animals debated

High food prices threaten seething Mideast

Transitioning To Organic Farming

TRADE WARS
Christchurch killer buildings had been deemed safe

Rare earthquake hits Arkansas

'I wanted to die', says quake penknife amputee

NZ promises Japan, China probe into school tragedy

TRADE WARS
Ivory Coast envoy reports for duty

New 'environment governance' on agenda in Nairobi

Nigerian troops uncover weapons cache

Three soldiers killed by Casamance rebels: military source

TRADE WARS
Study: Brain is a 'self-building toolkit'

Remains of Ice Age child found in Alaska

Men's cosmetics take off in China

Study: Low self-esteem increases bias


The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2010 - SpaceDaily. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement