Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Earth Science News .




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Personal cooling units on the horizon
by Staff Writers
University Park PA (SPX) May 02, 2016


The tiny wires of the nanowire array form on a template so they are uniform. Image courtesy Qing Wang, Penn State. For a larger version of this image please go here.

Firefighters entering burning buildings, athletes competing in the broiling sun and workers in foundries may eventually be able to carry their own, lightweight cooling units with them, thanks to a nanowire array that cools, according to Penn State materials researchers.

"Most electrocaloric ceramic materials contain lead," said Qing Wang, professor of materials science and engineering. "We try not to use lead. Conventional cooling systems use coolants that can be environmentally problematic as well. Our nanowire array can cool without these problems."

Electrocaloric materials are nanostructured materials that show a reversible temperature change under an applied electric field. Previously available electrocaloric materials were single crystals, bulk ceramics or ceramic thin films that could cool, but are limited because they are rigid, fragile and have poor processability. Ferroelectric polymers also can cool, but the electric field needed to induce cooling is above the safety limit for humans.

Wang and his team looked at creating a nanowire material that was flexible, easily manufactured and environmentally friendly and could cool with an electric field safe for human use. Such a material might one day be incorporated into firefighting gear, athletic uniforms or other wearables. They report their results in a recent issue of Advanced Materials.

Their vertically aligned ferroelectric barium strontium titanate nanowire array can cool about 5.5 degrees Fahrenheit using 36 volts, an electric field level safe for humans. A 500 gram battery pack about the size of an IPad could power the material for about two hours.

The researchers grow the material in two stages. First, titanium dioxide nanowires are grown on fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass. The researchers use a template so all the nanowires grow perpendicular to the glass' surface and to the same height. Then the researchers infuse barium and strontium ions into the titanium dioxide nanowires.

The researchers apply a nanosheet of silver to the array to serve as an electrode.

They can move this nanowire forest from the glass substrate to any substrate they want - including clothing fabric - using a sticky tape.

"This low voltage is good enough for modest exercise and the material is flexible," said Wang. "Now we need to design a system that can cool a person and remove the heat generated in cooling from the immediate area."

This solid state personal cooling system may one day become the norm because it does not require regeneration of coolants with ozone depletion and global warming potentials and could be lightweight and flexible.

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
Penn State
Bringing Order To A World Of Disasters
A world of storm and tempest
When the Earth Quakes






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Workers feeling the heat as climate change slashes productivity: report
Geneva (AFP) April 28, 2016
Climate change is exposing millions of workers to excessive heat, risking their health and income and threatening to erase more than $2.0 trillion in annual productivity by 2030, a UN report warned Thursday. More than one billion workers in countries hard-hit by global warming are already grappling with increasing severe heat, according to the report: "Climate Change and Labour: Impacts of H ... read more


DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Chile quake at epicenter of expanding disaster and failure data repository

Kenya building collapse toll rises to 21

Personal cooling units on the horizon

Workers feeling the heat as climate change slashes productivity: report

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
It takes more than peer pressure to make large microgels fit in

Folding molecules into screw-shaped structures

Engineers develop micro-sized, liquid-metal particles for heat-free soldering

Speedy bridge repair

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Scientists hope corrosion research prevents another Flint, Mich.

British explorer James Cook's ship believed found in US northeast

Do fish survive in streams in winter

Armed guards at India dams as drought leaves farmers dry

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Extreme weather linked to high pressure over Greenland

Researchers discover fate of melting glacial ice in Greenland

Ancient tectonic activity was trigger for ice ages

New maps chart Greenland glaciers' melting risk

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Crop advances grow with protection

Bacteria beneficial to plants have spread across California

Australian researchers map micronutrients in white rice

Honey bee study of parasites and disease reveals troubling trends

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Survivor rescued 13 days after deadly Ecuador quake

Survivors sought after 10 killed in Kenya building collapse

Chile ordered to pay $2.7 mn to 2010 tsunami victims

Seismologists ask: How close are we to an eruption?

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Senegal signs accord giving US forces permament access to the country

Kenya torches world's biggest ivory bonfire to save elephants

Mozambique police probe reports of mass grave in rebel stronghold

Kenya's mega ivory piles 'will burn even if it snows'

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Hominins may have been food for carnivores 500,000 years ago

Neandertals and Upper Paleolithic Homo sapiens had different dietary strategies

Chimp study explores the early origins of human hand dexterity

Toward quieting the brain




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News








The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement