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. Polar Bear Researchers Urge Caution In Hunting Policy

Each bear population must be evaluated separately, since results will be different depending on the population characteristics of the area. But the U of A scientists can say that in regions with fewer bears travelling a larger area (low-density population), there actually needs to be more males than breeding females to maintain high fertilization rates.
by Staff Writers
Edmonton, Canada (SPX) Nov 27, 2007
New research by the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, suggests that current wildlife management practices in Canada could make it harder for polar bears to find mates. Harvesting regulations vary around the world, notes PhD student Peter Molnár of the Department of Biological Sciences, the study's lead author. For example, Canada uses a quota system, permitting some hunting to a predetermined limit, while Norway bans any hunting of polar bears.

Current Canadian management polices encourage hunters to go after male bears in order to conserve females while maximizing the number of bears that may be harvested. But harvesting based on sex selection has reduced the number of males compared to females in polar bear populations across the Canadian Arctic, Molnár says.

Molnár's work was supervised by Professor Andrew Derocher, a noted polar bear expert, and Professor Mark Lewis, who holds the Canada Research Chair in Mathematical Biology. The study was conducted in collaboration with Dr. Mitchell Taylor from the Government of Nunavut. Their findings appeared Wednesday in the online edition of the Proceedings of the Royal Society, an academic journal based in the United Kingdom.

The U of A team warns that under certain conditions, this practice of sex-selective harvesting could lead to trouble when it comes to polar bears finding a mate - based on a biological mathematical model they developed, and data from the polar bear population at Lancaster Sound off Cornwallis Island (northwest of Baffin Island) in the High Arctic.

The mathematical model has given the researchers the ability to predict how many male bears are needed in an area compared to the number of female bears that are around, to maintain successful mating.

They determined that there is a critical threshold in the male-to-female ratio. If the sex ratio drops below this threshold, the model predicts a sudden and rapid collapse in fertilization rates. This threshold depends on whether the area has a high-density or low-density bear population.

Each bear population must be evaluated separately, since results will be different depending on the population characteristics of the area. But the U of A scientists can say that in regions with fewer bears travelling a larger area (low-density population), there actually needs to be more males than breeding females to maintain high fertilization rates.

Given this important population threshold, the authors concluded that polar bear populations should be closely monitored and carefully harvested, as severe negative effects could arise either from overharvesting male bears or from population decline.

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Tree Of Life For Flowering Plants Reveals Relationships Among Major Groups
Austin TX (SPX) Nov 27, 2007
The evolutionary Tree of Life for flowering plants has been revealed using the largest collection of genomic data of these plants to date, report scientists from The University of Texas at Austin and University of Florida. The scientists, publishing two papers in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this week online, found that the two largest groups of flowering plants, monocots (grasses and their relatives) and eudicots (including sunflowers and tomatoes), are more closely related to each other than to any of the other major lineages.

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