Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




WATER WORLD
Protecting drinking water systems from deliberate contamination
by Staff Writers
Southampton, UK (SPX) Jul 09, 2013


This is bacteria stained with SYTO 9 on deposits from a drinking water pipe. Credit: University of Southampton.

An international project has developed a response programme for rapidly restoring the use of drinking water networks following a deliberate contamination event.

The importance of water and of water infrastructures to human health and to the running of our economy makes water systems likely targets for terrorism and CBRN (chemical, biological and radionuclide) contamination. Reducing the vulnerability of drinking water systems to deliberate attacks is one of the main security challenges.

SecurEau, a four-year Seventh Framework Programme funded project, involved 12 partners, including the University of Southampton, from six European countries. It has developed a toolbox that can be implemented by a major European city in response to a contamination event, which includes:

+ tools for detecting water quality changes;

+ methods for rapidly identifying the source(s) of intentional contamination;

+ multi-step strategies for cleaning distribution systems;

+ analytical methods for confirming cleaning procedure efficiency.

Research groups from the University of Southampton, the only UK partner in the project, developed new methods and technologies for detecting low levels of microbial and radiological contaminants and improving the efficiency of decontamination protocols, with special attention to the role of biofilms.

The SecurEau team developed water quality sensors to be installed in a drinking water system, which allows an alert to be issued rapidly when abrupt changes in the quality of water are detected. These were confirmed by development of specific molecular tools by Southampton and several other partners.

The team also developed 'sentinel coupons' of polymeric materials (HDPE, EDPME, etc.) to be installed in water distribution systems for deposits and biofilms to form on their inner surface.

The coupons would be installed in the water supply system to monitor the concentration of the pollutant absorbed onto the like pipe walls. They would then be used to validate the cleaning procedures applied throughout the network during the crisis phase but also during 'normal' operation of the network.

Project partners also developed mathematical models to determine the areas which have been contaminated and the sources of contamination, and various cleaning methods, both traditional and new ones, to be applied to decontaminate the network.

Professor Bill Keevil, Director of Environmental Healthcare at the University of Southampton, says: "If a contamination event (accidental or deliberate) occurs in a drinking water network, it is essential to identify the sources of contamination and to determine the area which is likely to be contaminated, in order to isolate and decontaminate the affected area only, as well as keep supplying drinking water in non-affected areas.

"Our experiments show that coupon-monitoring devices are suited to follow deposit / biofilm formation in drinking water distribution systems as well as to investigate and confirm the successful removal of deposits from surfaces."

Professor Ian Croudace, Director of the University's Geosciences Advisory Unit, adds: "Rapidly restoring the functionality of drinking water infrastructures (catchment areas, raw water transfer systems, treatment facilities, treated water reservoirs and distribution networks), and the access to safe drinking water represents another major concern for regulatory agencies and water utilities.

Indeed, the damage resulting from impairment of drinking water services would seriously impact the quality of life of many people not only by directly harming them but also making water systems unusable for a long period of time with a risk of societal disorder (similar situation as with any accidental contamination events or natural disasters)."

This research has led to publication of a guide for end users and disseminated via a three day workshop in Germany involving 150 participants from 26 countries.

.


Related Links
University of Southampton
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WATER WORLD
Chemists work to desalt the ocean for drinking water, one nanoliter at a time
Austin TX (SPX) Jul 02, 2013
By creating a small electrical field that removes salts from seawater, chemists at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Marburg in Germany have introduced a new method for the desalination of seawater that consumes less energy and is dramatically simpler than conventional techniques. The new method requires so little energy that it can run on a store-bought battery. The ... read more


WATER WORLD
Man who battled Fukushima disaster dies of cancer

Fukushima radioactive groundwater readings rocket

REACTing to a crisis

RESCUE Consortium Demonstrates Technologies for First Responders

WATER WORLD
Saarland University scientists reveal structure of a supercooled liquid

Laser and optical glass can store data for millions of years

Mainz laser system allows determination of atomic binding energy of the rarest element on earth

After millennia of mining, copper nowhere near 'peak'

WATER WORLD
Protecting drinking water systems from deliberate contamination

African Development Bank funds Sierra Leone water project

Australia's Barrier Reef slips into 'poor' health

Satellites See Ups and Downs of Two Tropical Eastern Pacific Systems

WATER WORLD
Evidence suggests Antarctic crabs could be native

CryoSat maps largest-ever flood beneath Antarctica

Is Arctic Permafrost the "Sleeping Giant" of Climate Change?

The rhythm of the Arctic summer

WATER WORLD
The balancing act of producing more food sustainably

Earliest evidence of using flower beds for burial found in Raqefet Cave in Mt. Carmel

University of East Anglia research reveals true cost of farming to UK economy

No single origin for agriculture in the Fertile Crescent

WATER WORLD
Chantal nears hurricane strength in Caribbean

5,500 may have died in north India floods: officials

Stronger, more frequent tropical cyclones ahead: study

Europe floods to cost insurers up to $4.5 billion: Swiss Re

WATER WORLD
Three Mozambique soldiers arrested for highway robbery

Mozambique army attacks former rebel camp

Beijing finances new Guinea-Bissau presidential palace

Blue Helmets hurt in Darfur ambush: top peacekeeper

WATER WORLD
Ability of people to 'see' with their ears called impressive

Parts of ancient sphinx found in Israel

Extension of human life span is a political task

Dalai urges youth to build happier century on 78th birthday




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement