. Earth Science News .

Protecting living fossil trees
by Staff Writers
Brisbane, Australia (SPX) Mar 08, 2012

Dr Peter Prentis is using a new DNA sequencer to understand what makes certain tree species in Fiji rare.

Scientists are working to protect living fossil trees in Fiji from the impact of climate change with cutting-edge DNA sequencing technology. Dr Peter Prentis, from QUT's Science and Engineering Faculty, said the findings would enable researchers to understand how biological diversity is generated.

"Fiji is a hotspot for biodiversity. Most of the species that occur in Fiji aren't found anywhere else in the world," he said.

"My project looks at how island species in these ancient groups of trees originated."

Dr Prentis will use $150,000 DNA sequencer technology, called an Ion Torrent, to pinpoint genes in three pairs of tree species: Cynometra falcata (critically endangered) and C. insularis; Degeneria vitiense (vulnerable) and D. Roseiflora; and Podocarpus affinis (vulnerable) and P. neriifolius.

Dr Prentis said researchers would compare the vulnerable or endangered tree species with ones more commonly found in Fiji.

"We'll analyse each of the species pairs to find genes that have been important in the process of becoming unique. We're interested in how these rare species evolve," he said.

Dr Prentis said the research could predict how the trees will adapt to climate change.

"We need to understand how biodiversity is created in the first place to understand how to best conserve it in the future," Dr Prentis said.

"With climate change these species are going to have to respond to increasingly changing environmental conditions and an increase in extreme events, such as cyclones.

"We don't know if these living fossil trees have the potential to adjust to these future environments."

The new Ion Torrent technology will accelerate research at QUT, enabling scientists to analyse tens of thousands of genes at the same time, compared to studying a handful of genes simultaneously with a standard DNA sequencer.

"What we can do in a couple of hours on the Ion Torrent is the equivalent of six months' work on a standard DNA sequencer," Dr Prentis said.

The Ion Torrent, which can sequence whole microbial genomes and specific genes in species such as humans, insects and plants, will be used for health, agriculture and evolutionary research.

Dr Prentis' research, being conducted with Dr Gunnar Keppel from Curtin University in Western Australia, received $40,000 of funding from the Australian Pacific Sciences Foundation.

A preliminary paper, Diversification history and hybridisation of Dacrydium (Podocarpaceae) in remote Oceania, was published in the Australia Journal of Botany.

Related Links
Queensland University of Technology
Forestry News - Global and Local News, Science and Application

Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
Buy Advertising Editorial Enquiries


. Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

In forests, past disturbances obscure warming impacts
Millbrook NY (SPX) Mar 08, 2012
Past disturbances, such as logging, can obscure the effects of climate change on forest ecosystems. So reports a study just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The paper, exploring nitrogen dynamics, found that untangling climate impacts from other factors can be difficult, even when scientists have access to decades of data on a forest's environmental conditions. ... read more

Researchers harness Kraken to model explosions via transport

GIS siting of emergency vehicles improves response time

Thai PM in Japan vows no more flood chaos

Disasters cost $380 billion in 2011, says UN

Smart, self-healing hydrogels open far-reaching possibilities in medicine, engineering

'SimCity' game rebuilt for age of climate change

Apple unveils new iPad, Apple TV box

Dr. Strangelove and How I Learned to Love Space Debris

James Cameron to explore Earth's deepest ocean trench

Water shortage a global threat without urgent reform: OECD

World meets UN safe water goal

Current rates of ocean acidification are unparalleled in Earth's history

Moon to blame for sinking of Titanic?

Sand layer plays a key role in protecting the underlying permafrost in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

'Alien' seeds threaten Antarctica's landscape: study

Ice dam collapses at Argentine glacier

Shortcuts costly when buying conservation from farmers

Canadian farmers trust regulated dairy industry

A Vegetarian Cutlet

How to improve pesticide efficiency

Tsunami towns at crossroads, despite clean-up

Quake researchers warn of Tokyo's 'Big One'

Chaos as Sydney lashed by heaviest rainfall in five years

Hundreds more evacuated in Australia floods

Mali rebels strike amid post-Libya anarchy

Campaign to arrest Uganda rebel chief goes viral

Algerian Islamists set to score in polls

US pledges aid after 150 die in Congo blast

First Evidence of Hunting by Prehistoric Ohioans

Lockheed Martin and ZyGEM To Offer Rapid DNA Analysis Platform for Human Identity Testing

Scientists search for source of creativity

Bosnian fights to save 'bear children', Laka and Gvido

Memory Foam Mattress Review

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News


The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2012 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement