Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




FLORA AND FAUNA
Reproduction matters for microbes
by Staff Writers
Bristol UK (SPX) Jan 06, 2014


Trypanosomes belong to a strange group of protozoa that includes several other medically important parasites such as Leishmania, Trichomonas and Giardia.

Caught in the act! Researchers from the University of Bristol have observed mating for the first time in the microbes responsible for African sleeping sickness. This tropical disease is caused by trypanosomes, single-celled parasites that are found in the blood of those afflicted.

The Bristol team were able to see what the trypanosomes were getting up to inside the tsetse flies that carry the disease by using fluorescent markers [see image - link below]. The microscopic beasts were seen twirling and gyrating together before joining up into one hybrid cell.

To tell which was which, individual trypanosomes were tagged with different colours, with the result that the hybrid cells had both colours.

Professor Wendy Gibson, who led the research, commented: "It's not only bigger animals that have intricate courtship - but you need a powerful microscope to see this!"

Reproduction matters for microbes because it enables genes to be swapped between different strains, leading to new combinations of genes. In the case of disease-causing microbes like the trypanosome, reproduction can potentially lead to a lot of harmful genes being combined in one strain.

These new results suggest that reproduction is not an optional or rare part of this microbe's life cycle, but probably happens every time two different trypanosomes find themselves together in the same tsetse fly.

Trypanosomes belong to a strange group of protozoa that includes several other medically important parasites such as Leishmania, Trichomonas and Giardia. In the past, all these microbes were thought to reproduce just by splitting in half, but now results show that they also use reproduction to swap genes between strains. This research helps scientists understand how new strains of disease-causing microbes arise and how characteristics such as drug resistance get spread between different strains.

The study, carried out by researchers from Bristol's School of Biological Sciences and School of Veterinary Sciences in collaboration with the University of Cambridge, is published this week in Current Biology.

.


Related Links
University of Bristol
Darwin Today At TerraDaily.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





FLORA AND FAUNA
First Taiwan-born panda charms media
Taipei (AFP) Jan 04, 2014
The first Taiwan-born giant panda cub was unveiled to the media on Saturday in a warm up for her highly-anticipated public debut next week. Yuan Zai agilely climbed up and down for most of her 30-minute media preview inside an exhibition enclosure, as mother Yuan Yuan sat lazily aside munching bamboos. "Yuan Zai is growing bigger and bigger. She is very robust and is gaining strength. ... read more


FLORA AND FAUNA
Four arrested over Italy quake contract bribes

Philippine inflation jumps following Haiyan

System of phone alerts could warn of extreme weather in India

'Village of Widows' determined to rebuild in India flood disaster

FLORA AND FAUNA
Computers search for 'cheapium' versions of expensive materials

New compounds discovered that are hundreds of times more mutagenic

Japanese scientists move objects using acoustic levitation

Two new radar stations to be placed into service in Russia in 2014

FLORA AND FAUNA
Norway says working to end Russian boycott on fish exports

Melanin in marine fossils offers clues about where they could survive

For sharks, old age may be 70 or more: study

Partnership brings clean water to communities in Haiti, Peru

FLORA AND FAUNA
Ice rescue sparks Antarctic tourism debate

Antarctic mission over as ships clear ice field

Trapped ships break through Antarctic ice

US icebreaker heads to Antarctic to help stuck ships

FLORA AND FAUNA
Over 350 sick in Japan after eating pesticide-tainted food: NHK

New study may aid rearing of stink bugs for biological control

Important mutation discovered in dairy cattle

Chinese scientists create high-yield, salt-resistant rice variety

FLORA AND FAUNA
Texas to hire seismologist to study if quakes, energy production tied

Longmanshen fault zone still hazardous

Ground-breaking work sheds new light on volcanic activity

Supervolcano eruptions are triggered by melt buoyancy

FLORA AND FAUNA
Colonel Ndala: slain hope of reformed DR Congo army

A year after Mali action, France remains 'Africa's gendarme'

French defence minister sees no need for more troops in C. Africa

Fighting across South Sudan despite peace talks: army

FLORA AND FAUNA
Money Talks When Ancient Antioch Meets Google Earth

Reading a good book may make permanent changes to your brain

Finnish research team reveals how emotions are mapped in the body

What Does Compassion Sound Like?




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement