Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




EPIDEMICS
Revealed: Secret of HIV's natural born killers
by Staff Writers
Paris (AFP) June 10, 2012


Scientists on Sunday said they had found a key piece in the puzzle as to why a tiny minority of individuals infected with HIV have a natural ability to fight off the deadly AIDS virus.

In a study they said holds promise for an HIV vaccine, researchers from four countries reported the secret lies not in the number of infection-killing cells a person has, but in how well they work.

Only about one person in 300 has the ability to control the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) without drugs, using a strain of "killer" cells called cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) cells, previous research has found.

Taking that discovery further, scientists from the United States, Canada, Japan and Germany reported that the strain has molecules called receptors that are better able to identify HIV-infected white blood cells for attack.

Until now, it was well known that people with HIV "have tonnes of these killer cells," Bruce Walker, an infectious diseases expert at the Ragon Institute in Massachusetts, told AFP.

"We have been scratching our heads since then, asking how, with so many killer cells around, people are getting AIDS. It turns out there is a special quality that makes them (some cells) better at killing."

The study looked at 10 infected people, of whom five took antiretroviral drugs to keep HIV under control while five were so-called elite controllers who remained naturally healthy.

HIV kills a type of white blood cell called CD4, leaving people with AIDS wide open to other, opportunistic and potentially deadly infections.

"What we found was that the way the killer cells are able to see infected cells and engage them was different," said Walker.

"It is not just that you need a killer cell, what you need is a killer cell with a (T cell) receptor that is particularly good at recognising the infected cell. This gives us a way to understand what it is that makes a really good killer cell."

Walker said attempts at creating vaccines had so far failed because the T cell receptors they generated were not the efficient type.

But while the research has showed scientists how to find and measure the good cells, they still do not yet know how to generate them.

"The next step is to determine what it is about those receptors that is endowing them with that ability," said Walker.

"HIV has revealed another one of its secrets and that is how the body is able to effectively control the virus in certain individuals.

"Each secret that HIV reveals is putting us in a better position to ultimately make a vaccine to control the virus."

.


Related Links
Epidemics on Earth - Bird Flu, HIV/AIDS, Ebola






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





EPIDEMICS
New study shows why swine flu virus develops drug resistance
Bristol UK (SPX) Jun 08, 2012
Computer chips of a type more commonly found in games consoles have been used by scientists at the University of Bristol to reveal how the flu virus resists anti-flu drugs such as Relenza and Tamiflu. Professor Adrian Mulholland and Dr Christopher Woods from Bristol's School of Chemistry, together with colleagues in Thailand, used graphics processing units (GPUs) to simulate the molecular ... read more


EPIDEMICS
Study predicts imminent irreversible planetary collapse

Japan agency sorry for comparing radiation to wife

Lithuania launches regional nuclear safety watchdog

Italy's quake-struck north tries to reassure tourists

EPIDEMICS
Lawrence Livermore research identifies precise measurement of radiation damage

Hologram developers raise real cash for virtual stars

Smooth moves: how space animates Hollywood

Skeleton key

EPIDEMICS
Sea temperatures less sensitive to CO2 13 million years ago

China submersible to plumb new ocean depths

Geoengineering could disrupt rainfall patterns

No sea change for European fishing

EPIDEMICS
Will The Ice Age Strike Back

Secure, sustainable funding for Indigenous participation in Arctic Council a key priority

Expedition studies acid impacts on Arctic

Huge algae blooms discovered beneath Arctic ice

EPIDEMICS
Nepal 'Himalayan Viagra' harvest droops to record low

Latest genomic studies shed new light on maize diversity and evolution

OU scientists and international team deciper the genetic code of the tomato

Blowing in the wind: How hidden flower features are crucial for bees

EPIDEMICS
Afghan quakes kill at least three: officials

Dozens in hospital after 6.0 quake hits near Turkish resort

US strips seaweed from Japanese tsunami wreck

Like a jet through solid rock volcanic arc fed by rapid fluid pulses

EPIDEMICS
Contentious Angolan troops end Guinea-Bissau pullout

Carbon traders eye Mozambican stoves

LRA rebels attack DR Congo wildlife park guards

Conflicts hinder Niger, Mali locust control: UN food agency

EPIDEMICS
How infectious disease may have shaped human origins

Homo heidelbergensis was only slightly taller than the Neanderthal

Fossil discovery sheds new light on evolutionary history of higher primates

Monkey lip smacks provide new insights into the evolution of human speech




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement