Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Earth Science News .




WATER WORLD
Scientists confirm first two-headed bull shark
by Staff Writers
East Lansing MI (SPX) Mar 28, 2013


The difficulty of finding such oddities is due, in part, to creatures with abnormalities dying shortly after birth. In this instance, a fisherman found the two-headed shark when he opened the uterus of an adult shark. The two-headed shark died shortly thereafter and had little, if any, chance to survive in the wild.

Scientists have confirmed the discovery of the first-ever, two-headed bull shark. The study, led by Michigan State University and appearing in the Journal of Fish Biology, confirmed the specimen, found in the Gulf of Mexico April 7, 2011, was a single shark with two heads, rather than conjoined twins.

There have been other species of sharks, such as blue sharks and tope sharks, born with two heads. This is the first record of dicephalia in a bull shark, said Michael Wagner, MSU assistant professor of fisheries and wildlife, who confirmed the discovery with colleagues at the Florida Keys Community College.

"This is certainly one of those interesting and rarely detected phenomena," Wagner said. "It's good that we have this documented as part of the world's natural history, but we'd certainly have to find many more before we could draw any conclusions about what caused this."

The difficulty of finding such oddities is due, in part, to creatures with abnormalities dying shortly after birth. In this instance, a fisherman found the two-headed shark when he opened the uterus of an adult shark. The two-headed shark died shortly thereafter and had little, if any, chance to survive in the wild, Wagner added.

"You'll see many more cases of two-headed lizards and snakes," he said. "That's because those organisms are often bred in captivity, and the breeders are more likely to observe the anomalies."

The shark was brought to the marine science department at Florida Keys Community College. From there, it was transported to Michigan State's campus for further examination.

Wagner and his team were able to detail the discovery with magnetic resonance imaging. Without damaging the unique specimen, the MRIs revealed two distinct heads, hearts and stomachs with the remainder of the body joining together in back half of the animal to form a single tail.

As part of the published brief, Wagner noted that some may want to attribute the deformed shark to exposure to pollutants.

"Given the timing of the shark's discovery with the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, I could see how some people may want to jump to conclusions," Wagner said.

"Making that leap is unwarranted. We simply have no evidence to support that cause or any other."

Wagner's research is supported in part by MSU AgBioResearch.

.


Related Links
Michigan State University
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WATER WORLD
Researchers Issue Forecast for 'Moderate' New England Red Tide in 2013
Cape Cod MA (SPX) Mar 28, 2013
New England is expected to experience a "moderate" red tide this spring and summer, report NOAA-funded scientists studying the toxic algae that cause blooms in the Gulf of Maine. The "red tide" is caused by an alga Alexandrium fundyense, which produces a toxin that can cause paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). Red tide typically occurs annually along some portions of the Gulf of Maine coast. Th ... read more


WATER WORLD
Disasters caused $186 bn in damage last year: Swiss Re

Outside View: Homeless youth awareness

Britain enhancing SAR services

Los Angeles drills response to 7.8 quake

WATER WORLD
Lasers could yield particle research tool

Paint-on plastic electronics: Aligning polymers for high performance

DARPA Envisions the Future of Machine Learning

Removing orbital debris with less risk

WATER WORLD
Scientists confirm first two-headed bull shark

Predictions of climate impacts on fisheries can be a mirage

Researchers Issue Forecast for 'Moderate' New England Red Tide in 2013

Slovenia seeks better water management

WATER WORLD
The long winter ahead

For polar bears, it's survival of the fattest

NASA Begins New Season of Arctic Ice Science Flights

Significant contribution of Greenland's peripheral glaciers to sea-level rise

WATER WORLD
Climate change rewrites world wine list

Pesticides short-circuit bee brains: study

Brazil grocers pledge to shun Amazon meat

Brazil supermarkets to keep Amazon meat off shelves

WATER WORLD
Iceland sees unusual seismic activity at Hekla volcano

Huge and widespread volcanic eruptions triggered the end-Triassic extinction

Two quakes rattle Mexico

Six killed, 11 missing in Indonesian landslide: official

WATER WORLD
China an inspiration for S.Africa, Zuma tells Xi

Call for probe into S.Africa military presence in C.Africa

Sierra Leone sends 850 soldiers to Somalia

China's Xi vows to 'intensify' ties with Africa

WATER WORLD
Urban vegetation deters crime in Philadelphia

Patents said threat to 'genomic liberty'

'End of Men'? Not Even Close, Says UC San Diego Report on Gender in the Professions

Wireless, implanted sensor broadens range of brain research




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement