Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Earth Science News .




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















EARLY EARTH
Scientists unearth largest dinosaur species in Patagonia
by Brooks Hays
Washington (UPI) Aug 9, 2017


Paleontologists have unearthed a new species of titanosaur in Agentina's Patagonia. Researchers believe it is the largest dinosaur species ever discovered.

Titanosaurs are a diverse group of plant-eating sauropods. The group's newest member is Patagotitan mayorum. Its name is an homage to the dino's origins and size -- "mayorum" is the Greek word for titan.

Scientists first discovered the dinosaur remains in 2012. Since then, the excavation team has recovered dozens of fossilized bones representing six distinct specimens.

The newly discovered species lived roughly 100 million years ago and grew to be 20 feet tall at the shoulder. Patagotitan mayorum stretched a whopping 122 feet in length. A full-grown adult likely weighed between 70 and 77 tons.

"Estimating the body weight of an extinct animal is a challenging task," Diego Pol, scientists at the Egidio Feruglio palaeontology museum in Argentina, said in a news release. "We only have left the bones and from these remains we have to infer the body weight through the use of indirect methods."

Titanosaurs feature a wide spectrum of body sizes, but the largest species have all been found in Patagonia, which suggests the region featured a unique combination of vegetation and climate conducive to the evolution of large bodies.

Researchers say the new species would have dwarfed more fearsome predators, like Tyrannosaurus rex. But the herbivore was likely slow and docile.

Scientists found the new species' bones among three different layers of sediment, suggesting the dinosaurs frequented the floodplain where they became buried and preserved.

"In one of the levels there is a femur that, clearly, had been stepped on by another animal," said researcher Jose Luis. "At present, this is something common in places where elephants come back frequently, for example; it is very normal that they step on another elephant that was dead before."

Researchers described their latest discovery in the journal Proceeding of the Royal Society B.

EARLY EARTH
Well-preserved Canadian fossil reveals dinosaur armor like no other
Washington (UPI) Aug 3, 2017
One of the most well-preserved dinosaur fossils ever recovered has revealed a set of scales unlike any sported by armored dinosaurs. The newly discovered dinosaur species, Borealopelta markmitchelli, was the Humvee of the Cretaceous period. Despite the tank-like species' impressive size, the dinosaur's scales also served as camouflage, suggesting it hid to avoid predation. Spectr ... read more

Related Links
Explore The Early Earth at TerraDaily.com

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

EARLY EARTH
Tech advances will lead to MH370 discovery - Malaysia Airlines

Brazil troops storm Rio slums to catch gang leaders

Italy parliament approves Libya naval mission

Elephants, tigers kill one human a day in India

EARLY EARTH
Algorithms that can sketch, recreate 3-D shapes

Ferroelectric phenomenon proven viable for oxide electrodes, disproving predictions

Nanoparticles for 3-D printing in water open door to advanced biomedical materials

Materials governed by light

EARLY EARTH
Marine reserves can help commercial fishermen catch more fish, avoid bycatch

Guam told to 'enjoy paradise', ignore North Korean threat

4,500 families, major dam affected by Venezuela flooding

Benefits of investments in dikes worldwide known

EARLY EARTH
Not all glaciers in Antarctica have been affected by climate change

Alaska's North Slope snow-free season is lengthening

Researchers crack the 'Karakoram anomaly'

Rusting fool's gold in glaciers a sign of increased carbon

EARLY EARTH
Low to no risk from pesticide-tainted eggs: experts

Dutch egg probe widens to chicken meat tests

Mexichem buys 80% of Israel's Netafim for $1.5 bln

Sale of genetically modified salmon in Canada alarms environmentalists

EARLY EARTH
Mexico braces for more Tropical Storm Franklin

Tens of thousands evacuated after China quake kills 19

Typhoon Noru brings heavy rain to Japan, injures 51

Up to 100 feared dead, thousands injured in China quake: govt

EARLY EARTH
Calls for peace on eve of tense Kenya election

Zimbabwe confirms clash between soldiers and police

Rwanda's Kagame in landslide poll win with around 98% of votes

European support for Sahel 'mutually reinforcing': Germany

EARLY EARTH
New look at archaic DNA rewrites human evolution story

Origin of human genus may have occurred by chance

Cultural flexibility was key to surviving extreme dry periods in Africa

Shedding light deeper into the human brain




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement