Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Earth Science News .




WOOD PILE
Selectively logged Amazon forests play important role in climate
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Sep 22, 2015


This photo shows a logging road and surrounding forest five years after logging in a concession applying reduced impact logging. Taken in Amapa, Brazil. Image courtesy Ervan Rutishauser. For a larger version of this image please go here.

With careful management, selectively logged tropical Amazonian forests can recover their carbon stocks within a cutting cycle of 20 to 30 years, according to researchers who report their findings in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on September 21. The findings show that sustainably logged tropical forests continue to play a key role in global carbon sequestration, with important implications for global climate.

"We found that under current timber-harvesting intensities, Amazon forests logged with reduced-impact logging techniques shall recover their initial carbon stock in 7 to 21 years," says Ervan Rutishauser of CarboForExpert in Switzerland and CIRAD in France. "This is fast, compared to the recovery time of commercial volumes that can take up to a century to go back to pre-logging stocks."

About half of the remaining tropical forests are designated for timber production. And yet little is known about how those forests respond to logging pressure at the regional level. To find out, Rutishauser and colleagues conducted the first comprehensive assessment of post-logging recovery of above-ground carbon stored in trees across the whole Amazon Basin. The work was made possible with the development of Tropical Managed Forests Observatory, a pan-tropical network aimed at understanding the long-term effects of logging on tropical forest ecosystems.

The researchers focused on 79 permanent TmFO sample plots representing 376 hectares of forested area at 10 sites across the Amazon Basin. Their goal was to determine the rate at which the recovering forest can recapture carbon emitted through logging. They also sought to identify the main drivers determining that time to recovery of post-logging tree carbon.

Their analysis reveals a recovery time of 7 to 21 years under current logging intensities (10-30 m3/ha). That time to recover initial carbon stocks after selective logging depended almost exclusively on logging intensity--that is, on the amount of tree biomass removed or killed during timber harvesting.

"Our results imply that the time to recover carbon stocks does not significantly vary across the entire Amazon Basin, despite a well-known Northeast-Southwest environmental gradient," Rutishauser says.

The finding can now serve as a useful decision-making tool for forest managers and policy makers, the researchers say. They note, however, that poor logging practices continue to degrade many forests, while others continue to be cleared and converted into more profitable pasture and plantations.

The researchers' next step is to explore the time to recovery of forests under heavier commercial logging intensities across TmFO.

"While carbon-oriented forestry might trigger a shift toward sustainable forest management, wood supply shall remain the principal objective of forest management," Rutishauser says. "Our aim is to provide scientific evidence and practical guidance to define sustainable harvest intensities that ensure both long-term timber harvest and maintenance of carbon stocks."

This study was carried out in the framework of the Tropical managed Forests Observatory, supported by the Sentinel Landscape program of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research - Forest Tree and the Agroforestry Research Program.

Current Biology, Rutishauser et al.: "Rapid tree carbon stock recovery in managed Amazonian forests"


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
Cell Press
Forestry News - Global and Local News, Science and Application






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WOOD PILE
Protected areas save mangroves, reduce carbon emissions
Durham NC (SPX) Sep 15, 2015
Protected areas not only keep significant swaths of Indonesia's shrinking mangrove habitats intact, but also prevent emissions of carbon dioxide that would have been released had these mangroves been cleared, according to a study in the journal Ecological Economics. Published online, the analysis examined the success of protected areas between 2000 and 2010, finding that their use has avoi ... read more


WOOD PILE
Fukushima dumps first batch of once-radioactive water in sea

Bulgaria deploying up to 1,000 troops at Turkish border

Mexican FM urges 'exhaustive' probe into Egypt tourist deaths

Charity that helped academics flee Nazis aids Syrians and Iraqis

WOOD PILE
'Lab-on-a-Chip' to cut costs of sophisticated tests for diseases and disorders

First new cache-coherence mechanism in 30 years

One step closer to a new kind of computer

Researchers develop 'instruction manual' for futuristic metallic glass

WOOD PILE
Omega-3's are vital for a healthy ocean

Acidic ocean will bend the mermaid's wineglass

The saying 'It never rains but it pours' is truer than ever in Scotland

Robots help to map England's only deep-water Marine Conservation Zone

WOOD PILE
Melting Arctic sea ice accelerates methane emissions

Adaptation to high-fat diet, cold had profound effect on Inuit, including shorter height

Arctic sea ice summertime minimum is fourth lowest on record

Solving the problem of sea ice thickness distribution using molecular concepts

WOOD PILE
Study of US farm data shows loss of crop diversity

Fearless fowl grow and lay better

Hunter-gatherers were enjoying oatmeal 30,000 years ago

Land degradation costs trillions of dollars

WOOD PILE
Several dead as severe floods hit Sierra Leone capital

Chile quake kills 10, one million evacuated

Lessons from 2010 quake saved lives in Chile: experts

Flash flood toll rises to eight in US state of Utah

WOOD PILE
Burkina on the brink amid coup led by ex-dictator's ally

Dealing with climate change and local beliefs in Africa

Shots fired as Burkina Faso guards seize president, PM

Mozambique opposition boycotts peace talks

WOOD PILE
Scientists report earlier date of shift in human ancestors' diet

Fossil trove adds a new limb to human family tree

Bonobos use finger-pointing, hand gestures to communicate

Ancient human shoulders reveal links to ape ancestors




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.