Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Earth Science News .




WATER WORLD
Source of life running out: water scientists
by Staff Writers
Paris (AFP) May 24, 2013


The majority of people on Earth people will face severe water shortages within a generation or two if pollution and waste continues unabated, scientists warned at a conference in Bonn Friday.

"This handicap will be self-inflicted and is, we believe entirely avoidable," read a document entitled The Bonn Declaration issued at the close of the four-day international huddle.

The conference sought to assess the evidence of Man's impact on freshwater resources, which constitute only 2.5 percent of the total volume of water on Earth.

Currently, an estimated third of the world's seven million people has limited access to adequate fresh water, according to conference delegates.

"In the short span of one or two generations, the majority of the nine billion people on Earth will be living under the handicap of severe pressure on fresh water," said the declaration.

The nine billion mark is widely projected to be reached from about 2040.

"We are flying the red flag out of our conference here," Charles Vorosmarty, co-chairman of the Global Water System Project research body that hosted the meeting, said in a teleconference from Bonn.

"These self-inflicted wounds have long-term legacy effects that are not easy to turn around."

The declaration points out that humanity uses an area the size of South America to grow crops and another the size of Africa to raise livestock.

Two-thirds of major river deltas are sinking due to groundwater extraction, and tens of thousands of large dams are distorting natural river flows on which ecosystems have depended for millennia.

Much damage is being done by river pollution from sewer drainage or agricultural fertiliser and pesticide use.

Already, about a billion people around the world are dependent on finite water supplies being depleted at a fast rate, said Vorosmarty, who made a plea for more financial and technical resources for research.

"We're not making the requisite commitments to creating observational networks and satellite systems that can measure the state of water," he said.

"Increasingly, we are flying blind and finding it very difficult to figure where we are and where we're going and whether the things we are doing are making a difference."

UN-Water, a coordinating body for water efforts by UN groups, says Earth has about 35 million cubic kilometres (eight million cubic miles) of fresh water -- 70 percent of it locked up in ice and permanent snow cover.

Thirty percent of freshwater is stored underground in groundwater, which constitutes 97 percent of all freshwater potentially available for human use.

About 0.3 percent is found in lakes and rivers.

Experts say some 3,800 cubic kilometres of fresh water are extracted from aquatic ecosystems around the world each year, partly as a result of global warming.

.


Related Links
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WATER WORLD
Shifts in global water systems markers of The Anthropocene epoch
Bonn, Germany (SPX) May 22, 2013
A suite of disquieting global phenomena have given rise to the "Anthropocene," a term coined for a new geologic epoch characterized by humanity's growing dominance of the Earth's environment and a planetary transformation as profound as the last epoch-defining event - the retreat of the glaciers 11,500 years ago. And in Bonn, Germany May 21-24, world experts will experts will focus on how ... read more


WATER WORLD
Japan nuclear lab accident affected 30: agency

Kerry unveils $4 bn Palestinian investment plan

Death toll in China blast rises to 33: Xinhua

Italian town struggles to rebuild a year after quakes

WATER WORLD
Ecuador's only satellite may have been damaged in space collision

New analysis yields improvements in 3D imaging

Professor who once had to work at Subway makes math breakthrough

Iron-platinum alloys could be new-generation hard drives

WATER WORLD
Source of life running out: water scientists

S. Korea commission to probe $20 bln river project

Spain and France agree on fishing quota swap

LLNL scientist finds topography of Eastern Seaboard muddles ancient sea level changes

WATER WORLD
Slovenian flyer completes eco-friendly Arctic voyage

Russia plans urgent evacuation of Arctic post as ice melts

Sea level influenced tropical climate during the last ice age

World's biggest ice sheets likely more stable than previously believed

WATER WORLD
New research shows that potatoes provide one of the best nutritional values per penny

Researchers identify new target to boost plant resistance to insects and pathogens

The world's favorite fruit only better-tasting and longer-lasting

China to ban non-French 'champagne' copycats

WATER WORLD
Massive Far East quake felt in Moscow, no casualties

Saudi researchers say drones could warn of desert flash floods

China steps up flood preparations after storms

Evacuation orders in Chile, Argentina over volcano

WATER WORLD
Climate change drowning the 'Venice of Africa'

Outside View: Somalia's Jubaland

Nigeria says women, children held by Boko Haram freed

Africa celebrates progress and 50 years of 'unity'

WATER WORLD
Monkey teeth help reveal Neanderthal weaning

China newborn rescued from toilet pipe: report

Origins of human culture linked to rapid climate change

Climate change boosted human development: study




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement