Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




EPIDEMICS
Spanish hospital to trial new HIV treatment
by Staff Writers
Barcelona (AFP) Dec 09, 2013


Romania spends too much on AIDS, says minister
Bucharest (AFP) Dec 09, 2013 - Romanian Culture Minister Daniel Barbu sparked outrage Monday after saying the national anti-AIDS programme received too much funding compared to his own department.

"During debates on the 2014 budget I was shocked to discover that the budget earmarked for the fight against AIDS was half that devoted to all the programmes run by the culture ministry," Barbu said during a public debate.

He said that he did not want to sound cynical but "could not help wondering how many Shakespeare festivals could be organised if the (anti-AIDS) programme did not exist or if its budget was halved".

"Romania is not South Africa, nor does it count millions of people affected by this hideous scourge of our times," he said.

UNOPA, an association supporting people affected by HIV/AIDS, condemned the remarks as of "major offence to patients and to the experts fighting to save their lives".

"The minister blames patients for the lack of festivals and suggests the anti-AIDS programme should be abandoned, which would mean condemning these people, most of whom were infected in 1988-1990 by the health system," UNOPA said.

Under the Communist regime, which was toppled in December 1989, hundreds of babies were infected with HIV after transfusions with unscreened blood or injections with unsterilised needles.

UNOPA president Iulian Petre told AFP that 45 million euros ($61.7 million) went to the anti-AIDS programme in 2013, down from 52 million euros last year, which is "a far cry from the patients' needs".

He added that many patients are deprived of regular treatment because they cannot afford the weekly trips to city hospitals that administer anti-retrovirals.

Romania's health system suffers from a dramatic shortage of funds, with hospitals often lacking even the most basic of medicines.

Researchers at a Spanish hospital announced Monday they will start trials next year of a therapeutic vaccine for patients who already have HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

A therapeutic vaccine treats a disease rather than preventing it.

Barcelona's Hospital Clinic said it would conduct the trial as part of a four-year research project being carried out with other centres in Spain, Belgium and The Netherlands.

"The goal is to achieve a functional cure of HIV," said Josep Maria Gatell, director of the Hospital Clinic's infectious disease unit.

"This would mean that we are able to control HIV in infected people without having to provide them with anti-retroviral treatment their whole lives," he told a news conference.

More than 30 million people worldwide are infected with HIV, most of them living in developing countries, Gatell said.

"Although combined anti-retroviral therapy has proven to be highly effective to prevent clinical progression and death, by itself it is unable to eradicate the infection and other alternative approaches are urgently needed," he added.

The therapeutic vaccine research project has received six million euros ($8.2 million) in funding from the EU's executive European Commission.

The trial is being conducted on an updated version of a vaccine unveiled by the same research team in January 2013 which was found to temporarily brake growth of the HIV virus in infected patients.

That vaccine was tested on 36 people carrying the virus and was found to be safe for humans.

It led to a dramatic drop in the amount of HIV detected in some patients but it lost its effectiveness after a year, when the patients had to return to their regular combination therapy of expensive anti-retroviral drugs.

The vaccine, dubbed VIH-TriMix-ARNm, is based on the patient's own RNA, a nucleic acid in all living cells which conveys genetic information. RNA is also being used to try to develop new treatments against cancer.

Researchers have tested the updated vaccine on animals and the first results will be known during the first half of 2014.

After carrying out toxicity tests on people in 2014, the first phase of clinical trials in humans will begin at the Hospital Clinic in 2015. The aim is to determine the appropriate dose and the vaccine's safety.

If the vaccine passes this phase, researchers will start testing its effectiveness on 40 patients and two control groups of 15 people each in either 2016 or 2017.

.


Related Links
Epidemics on Earth - Bird Flu, HIV/AIDS, Ebola






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





EPIDEMICS
First real-time flu forecast successful
New York NY (SPX) Dec 09, 2013
Scientists were able to reliably predict the timing of the 2012-2013 influenza season up to nine weeks in advance of its peak. The first large-scale demonstration of the flu forecasting system by scientists at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health was carried out in 108 cities across the United States. The flu forecasting system adapts techniques used in modern weather pred ... read more


EPIDEMICS
Philippines typhoon survivors determined to hope

Philippines to seek more aid from Japan at summit

One month after super typhoon, Philippines faces huge challenges

Lebanon races to help Syria refugees ahead of storm

EPIDEMICS
SST Australia: Signed, Sealed and Ready for Delivery

Scientists build a low-cost, open-source 3D metal printer

An ecosystem-based approach to protect the deep sea from mining

Study shows how water dissolves stone, molecule by molecule

EPIDEMICS
Israel, Jordan, Palestinians to ink water-sharing deal

Precipitation declines in Pacific Northwest mountains

Environmentalists hail China's banquet ban on shark fin

Scripps Leads First Global Snapshot of Key Coral Reef Fishes

EPIDEMICS
Airborne Radar Looking Through Thick Ice During NASA Polar Campaigns

Lakes discovered beneath Greenland ice sheet

Prince Harry's South Pole race cancelled, but trek goes on

Antarctic fjords are climate-sensitive hotspots of diversity in a rapidly warming region

EPIDEMICS
Saudi, China scientists decode date-palm tree DNA

Qantas steward with Parkinson's to sue over pesticide link

IPM for Billbugs in Orchardgrass

Unlikely collaboration leads to discovery of 'gender-bending' plant

EPIDEMICS
At least 11 dead after heavy rains in northeast Brazil

Slippery clay intensified Japan 2011 tsunami-quake: scientists

Malaysia floods force more evacuations as 1 more dead

One dead, 19,000 evacuated in Malaysia floods

EPIDEMICS
Bangui residents guide French troops in weapons hunt

1,600 French troops in CAR, no fresh clashes: army

US praises French 'leadership' in C. Africa conflict

France tells Africa to take charge of security

EPIDEMICS
Domestication of dogs may have come from pre-existing capacity of wolves to learn

First evidence of primates regularly sleeping in caves

Evidence of funerary meal found at 13,000-year-old gravesite in Israel

Skull find shows women were sacrificed in ancient China




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement