Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




WHALES AHOY
Study shows military sonar changes feeding behavior in whales
by Staff Writers
Santa Cruz, Calif. (UPI) Jul 3, 2013


disclaimer: image is for illustration purposes only

Military sonar can change the behavior of whales, causing the ocean giants to avoid their usual feeding spots, a U.S. study found.

Writing in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the researchers said some blue whales off the coast of California have been seen to change their behavior when exposed to the sort of underwater sounds used during U.S. military exercises.

Researchers exposed tagged blue whales to simulated sonar sounds significantly less intense than the military uses.

"Whales clearly respond in some conditions by modifying diving behavior and temporarily avoiding areas where sounds were produced," said lead author Jeremy Goldbogen of Cascadia Research, a non-profit research organization based in Washington state focusing on marine mammal studies.

The whales were tagged with non-invasive suction cups sensors, which recorded acoustic data and high-resolution movements as the animals were exposed to the controlled sounds.

The area of the ocean off the California coast, where blue whales often feed, is also the site of military training and testing exercises that involve loud mid-frequency sonar signals, the researchers said.

"These are the first direct measurements of individual responses for any baleen whale species to these kinds of mid-frequency sonar signals," Brandon Southall, a researcher at the University of California, Santa Cruz, said. "These findings help us understand risks to these animals from human sound and inform timely conservation and management decisions."

.


Related Links
Follow the Whaling Debate






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WHALES AHOY
Gulls feasting on whales? In Argentina, yes
Valdes Peninsula, Argentina (AFP) July 01, 2013
It's a weird, lopsided fight if ever there was one: seagulls divebombing to attack and feed on the fat of 50-ton whales and their babies. And the birds are winning. The battle, new in recent years, is playing out in the South Atlantic off the coast of Argentina's Patagonia region, and is not known to be happening in waters elsewhere in the world that are home to the mighty mammals. The e ... read more


WHALES AHOY
REACTing to a crisis

RESCUE Consortium Demonstrates Technologies for First Responders

India chopper crash kills 20 as flood rescue forges on

India rescue chopper crash death toll rises to 20

WHALES AHOY
Making hydrogenation greener

Inmarsat's First Fully Assembled Global Xpress Satellite Achieves Significant Testing Milestone

The quantum secret to alcohol reactions in space

Study refutes claims world is running out of copper

WHALES AHOY
Red Cross cartoon to demystify Pacific climate change

Greenhouse gas likely altering ocean foodchain

Breakthrough in El Nino forecasting

El Nino unusually active in the late 20th century

WHALES AHOY
CryoSat maps largest-ever flood beneath Antarctica

Is Arctic Permafrost the "Sleeping Giant" of Climate Change?

The rhythm of the Arctic summer

Global cooling as significant as global warming

WHALES AHOY
Workers at industrial farms carry drug-resistant bacteria associated with livestock

Improving crop yields in a world of extreme weather events

Cattle flatulence doesn't stink with biotechnology

Balancing food security and environmental quality in China

WHALES AHOY
Scramble to reach Indonesia quake survivors as toll hits 22

Dalila grows into hurricane off Mexico coast

India bans building along rivers in flood-hit north

Five dead, dozens injured in Indonesia quake

WHALES AHOY
UN intervention force raises hopes in DR Congo

Grenade strike kills aid worker in Sudan's Darfur: UN

Military claims 100 attackers killed in central Nigeria

UN peacekeepers take over ahead of Mali polls

WHALES AHOY
Altitude sickness may hinder ethnic integration in the world's highest places

What Is the Fastest Articulated Motion a Human Can Execute?

Skull find challenges claim about first white man in eastern Australia

Lessons at home and homework at school in US




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement